cancer Clinical Trials drug development Surgery

Neoadjuvant Combination Checkpoint Blockade Trial Yields High Response Rates for Patients with High-Risk Stage 3 Melanoma

Combination checkpoint blockade before surgery (neoadjuvant therapy) produced a high response rate among patients with high-risk stage 3 melanoma, with nearly half having no sign of disease at surgery, but a high incidence of side effects caused the trial to be closed early. The phase II study was led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Results of the study, the first randomized neoadjuvant clinical trial
Biotechnology Regenerative Medice stem cells

New Technique Uses Umbilical Cord Stem Cells for Early Repair of Cleft Palate

A technique using umbilical cord blood stem cells could be a promising new approach for repair of cleft palate in infants, reports a paper in The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.  Performed as part of reconstructive surgery when the infant is a few months old, the stem cell procedure provides good results in growing new bone to close the upper jaw cleft – and may avoid the need for later bone graft surgery, according to the case report by Alejandro Garcia Botero, MD, of Hospital
Biotechnology cancer Cell Therapy

Radiation Therapy Prior to Surgery Reduces the Risk of Secondary Tumors in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients

Breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant radiation therapy have improved cancer-free survival over adjuvant radiation Moffitt Cancer Center researchers launched a first of its kind study comparing the long-term benefits of radiation therapy in women with breast cancer either before surgery (neoadjuvant) or after surgery (adjuvant). Their study, published in the June 30 issue of Breast Cancer Research, found that patients who have neoadjuvant radiation therapy have a significantly lower risk
Biotechnology Cardiology

Risk of infection higher for patients with obesity after bypass surgery: University of Alberta research

Patients with obesity have a higher risk of infection within 30 days after receiving heart bypass surgery, according to a series of studies conducted by University of Alberta researchers at the Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine. The team analyzed data from 56,722 patients in the provincial registry to examine associations between body mass index (BMI) and various outcomes following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), also
Biotechnology cancer

The calling card of aggressive thyroid cancer

A new discovery from University of Alberta scientists represents an important milestone in the fight against thyroid cancer. In a study published in EBioMedicine and recently presented at the American Thyroid Association annual meeting, the team has identified a marker of aggressive disease for papillary thyroid cancer, which comprises about 90 per cent of all thyroid cancers. The marker--a protein known as Platelet Derived Growth Factor Receptor Alpha, or PDGFRA--could
cancer Cancer Discovery Neurology

Tumor Paint Brings Light To Toddler’s Brain Tumor

In December of last year, Laura Coffman began to notice that something wasn’t quite right with her 2-year-old son, Hunter. He was leaning to one side and seemed to lose his balance easily. When he became lethargic and started vomiting a few days later on Dec. 28, she knew it was time to see the pediatrician. After all standard tests came back normal, they were sent to Seattle Children’s for
cancer

New Paper From University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center Provides Insights For Music Therapy In Surgical Area

A new paper published in the September 2016 issue of the AORN Journal provides insights into the impact of implementing a music therapy program for surgical patients. The paper, written by two music therapists and a nurse anesthetist at University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, is based on what they learned while conducting a two-year randomized study to learn the effect of live and recorded music on the anxiety of 207
cancer

Stereotactic Radiosurgery May Be Best for Patients with Metastatic Brain Tumors

Patients with three or fewer metastatic brain tumors who received treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) had less cognitive deterioration three months after treatment than patients who received SRS combined with whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). These findings are according to the results of a federally funded, Mayo Clinic-led, multi-institution research study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. “Metastatic brain tumors are unfortunately common in patients with
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Drug Therapies Showing Greater Promise for Pre-Kidney Transplant Patients

Early findings by researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine suggest that the use of a second generation cancer drug, carfilzomib, may provide an improved approach for the reduction of antibodies in potential kidney transplant candidates. The research team includes members from UC Transplant Clinical Research, UC’s Division of Hematology Oncology and the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center’s Biomedical Informatics division. This pre-transplant drug therapy approach is
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First-of-Its-Kind Procedure Combines Scalp, Skull, Kidney and Pancreas Transplant

Simultaneous transplantation of a "composite" skull and scalp flap plus a kidney and pancreas—all from the same donor—provided excellent outcomes for a patient with a non-healing scalp defect and declining organ kidney and pancreas function, according to a report in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). The experience may open the way to further procedures combining
Biotechnology cancer Cancer Discovery

Precision Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

Precision medicine’s public face is that of disease — and better treatments for that disease through targeted therapies. But precision medicine has an unsung partner that could affect the lives of many more people: Precision prevention — a reflection of the growing realization that preventing cancer and other diseases may not be one-size-fits-all. “Precision medicine has been kind of a buzzword recently, but often when people think about precision medicine,
Antibiotics Biotechnology

Harvard Scientists Report on Novel Method for Extending the Life of Implantable Devices in situ

Blood-contacting implantable medical devices, such as stents, heart valves, ventricular assist devices, and extracorporeal support systems, as well as vascular grafts and access catheters, are used worldwide to improve patients’ lives. However, these devices are prone to failure due to the body’s responses at the blood-material interface; clots can form and inflammatory reactions can prevent the device from performing as indicated. Currently, when this occurs, the only solution is to