age-related decline

How summer and diet damage your DNA, and what you can do

  Today, your body will accumulate quadrillions of new injuries in your DNA. The constant onslaught of many forms of damage, some of which permanently mutates your genes, could initiate cancer and prove fatal. Yet all is not doomed: The lives we lead determine how well our cells can handle this daily molecular erosion. Certain cells are particularly at risk. Your skin, for instance, is constantly being bombarded by high-energy
cancer Cancer Discovery Immunotherapies

Checkpoint Inhibitor Shrinks Advanced Squamous Cell Skin Cancer

Clinical trials show that an immune checkpoint inhibitor shrinks the tumors of nearly half of patients with an incurable, advanced form of a common skin cancer, an international team led by a researcher at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in the New England Journal of Medicine. “These results mark a potential paradigm shift in the treatment of patients with advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, who to date have had very
cancer Cancer Discovery

Early Skin Cancer More Accurately Diagnosed by Dermatologist Than Other Providers

Physician assistants (PAs) are increasingly used in dermatology practices to cut costs and improve access to care, but are more likely than dermatologists to perform unnecessary skin biopsies to check for cancer, while being less likely to accurately diagnose early stage skin cancers, according to new research conducted by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The results of the study, led by Laura Ferris, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor, University of Pittsburgh,
Biotechnology cancer Cell Therapy Clinical Trials

Short-Course Radiation Treatment Is Safe and Effective for Skin Cancer

A recent Penn State College of Medicine physician’s study review suggests that shorter courses of radiation are preferable to longer ones for older patients receiving treatment for slow-growing skin cancers. Skin basal and squamous cell cancers are common among patients over 60 years old and are rarely fatal. These cancers—which look like moles, freckles or skin tags—can be removed surgically but in some cases radiation therapy is preferred. Doctors often
cancer

Short-Course Radiation Treatment Is Safe and Effective for Skin Cancer

A recent Penn State College of Medicine physician’s study review suggests that shorter courses of radiation are preferable to longer ones for older patients receiving treatment for slow-growing skin cancers. Skin basal and squamous cell cancers are common among patients over 60 years old and are rarely fatal. These cancers—which look like moles, freckles or skin tags—can be removed surgically but in some cases radiation therapy is preferred. Doctors often recommend radiation
cancer

Placental Cells Significantly Inhibit Cancer Cell Growth in Newly Published Study

According to the peer-reviewed article in the journal Scientific Reports, placenta-derived cells called PLX cells, exhibit a strong inhibitory effect on various lines of breast, colorectal, kidney, liver, lung, muscle and skin cancers. The research was conducted over more than two years by Pluristem Therapeutics, Inc., a Haifa-based biotechnology company. The article titled “Human Placental-Derived Adherent Stromal Cells Co-Induced with TNF‑a and IFN‑g Inhibit Triple-Negative Breast Cancer in Nude Mouse Xenograft
cancer

Skin cancer on the rise

New diagnoses for two types of skin cancer increased in recent years, according to a Mayo Clinic-led team of researchers. Their paper, published today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, uses medical records from the Rochester Epidemiology Project to compare diagnoses of basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma -- both nonmelanoma skin cancers -- between 2000 and 2010 to diagnoses in prior years. The Rochester Epidemiology project is a medical records
cancer

Beta Blocker Shows Cancer-Fighting Properties

The beta blocker carvedilol could one day be used in creams or sprays that prevent skin cancer A new study finds that carvedilol, a drug typically used to treat high blood pressure, can protect against the sun-induced cell damage that leads to skin cancer. Researchers serendipitously discovered the beta blocker’s cancer-fighting properties after making an error in the lab. Sherry Liang, a graduate student at the Western University of Health
rare diseases Vaccines

New Driver, Target in Advanced Mucosal Melanoma

Not all melanomas are created equal. While most melanomas appear on the skin as the result of sun exposure, a small subset of melanomas arise spontaneously from mucosal tissues. And while targeted treatments and immunotherapies have dramatically improved the prognosis for many patients with sun-associated melanomas, these treatments are ineffective in the mucosal form of the disease. A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in the journal Melanoma
cancer

Drug Combination Delivered by Nanoparticles May Help in Melanoma Treatment

The first of a new class of medication that delivers a combination of drugs by nanoparticle may keep melanoma from becoming resistant to treatment, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. CelePlum-777 combines a special ratio of the drugs Celecoxib, an anti-inflammatory, and Plumbagin, a toxin. By combining the drugs, the cells have difficulty overcoming the effect of having more than one active ingredient. Celecoxib and Plumbagin work together
Biotechnology cancer Immunotherapies

Immune Responses Against a Virus-Related Skin Cancer Suggest Ways to Improve Immunotherapy

Researchers at Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington say a new study suggests ways to improve immune therapy for certain cancers including a virus-associated form of Merkel cell carcinoma, a rare, aggressive skin cancer. Merkel cell carcinoma, or MCC, is 35 times less common than melanoma, but on average, it is about three times more likely to be deadly. There are currently no therapies approved
Biotechnology cancer

New Topical Immunotherapy Effective Against Early Skin Cancer

A combination of two topical drugs that have been in use for years triggers a robust immune response against precancerous skin lesions, according to a new study. The research, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Harvard Medical School, shows that the therapy activates the immune system’s T cells, which then attack the abnormal skin cells. The study, which involved patients with actinic keratosis, a precursor to