cancer Cancer Discovery Cancer screening

Investigational Drug Shows Promising Results in Phase II Study of Aggressive, Often Fatal Blood Disorder with No Approved Therapies

A Phase I/II study, led by investigators at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, reports an investigational drug called tagraxofusp has demonstrated high response rates in patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN), a rare but highly aggressive – and often fatal bone marrow and blood disorder – for which there are no existing approved therapies. Findings from the study are being presented Dec. 3 at the 60th American Society of
cancer

Tumor-Like Spheres Help Scientists Discover Smarter Cancer Drugs

Cancer is a disease often driven by mutations in genes. As researchers learn more about these genes, and the proteins they code for, they are seeking smarter drugs to target them. The ultimate goal is to find ways to stop cancer cells from multiplying out of control, thereby blocking the growth and spread of tumors. Now researchers from The Scripps Research Institute are reporting an innovative new method to screen
Biotechnology

Rutgers Researchers Help Validate Discovery Method to Identify Antibodies that Target Tumors

The development of targeted tools for therapy is a major focus in oncology.  A new study by investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey at University Hospital, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School and colleagues from the University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center and New Mexico-based Specifica, Inc., describes what they call a “major advance” to a screening technique they pioneered that searches for molecular signatures intrinsic to normal
Diabetes

Animal Study Suggests Common Diabetes Drug May Also Help with Nicotine Withdrawal

In a mouse study, a drug that has helped millions of people around the world manage their diabetes might also help people ready to kick their nicotine habits. In a report published this week in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), investigators say metformin, an inexpensive drug commonly used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes, appears to block symptoms of nicotine
Parkinson's Pharmaceuticals

Mutation of Worm Gene, Swip-10, Triggers Age-Dependent Death of Dopamine Neurons, Key Feature of Parkinson’s Disease

Dopamine, a signaling chemical in the brain, has the lofty job of controlling emotions, moods, movements as well as sensations of pleasure and pain. Dysfunction of this critical neurotransmitter is the cause of a number of diseases, most notably, Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s disease is caused by the death of dopamine-producing cells and most theories of disease risk involve the selective vulnerability of ageing dopamine neurons to genetic mutations or to
cancer Cancer Discovery

Gene-Based Test for Urine Detects, Monitors Bladder Cancer

Researchers at The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a test for urine, gathered during a routine procedure, to detect DNA mutations identified with urothelial cancers. UroSEEK uses urine samples to seek out mutations in 11 genes or the presence of abnormal numbers of chromosomes that would indicate the presence of DNA associated with bladder cancer or upper tract urothelial cancer (UTUC). The researchers said the test, when combined with cytology,
cancer Clinical Trials

Phase I Clinical Trial Shows Some Promise for Investigational Drug for Melanoma

An investigational compound designed to block a hyperactive cell growth signal in advanced melanoma and other cancers has shown some promise in an early-stage clinical trial, researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and other institutions have reported. In JCI Insight, UNC Lineberger’s Stergios Moschos, MD, and colleagues published the results of a phase I, multi-institution clinical trial for an investigational treatment for melanoma and other
Pharmaceutical Business News

Celgene to buy Juno for $9 billion to boost CAR-T expertise

(Reuters) - Celgene Corp announced a $9 billion cash buyout of Juno Therapeutics Inc on Monday as it moves to cement its position as a key player in a new range of cancer therapies. The offer of $87 per share for the 90 percent of Juno that Celgene does not own sent Juno’s stock soaring 27 percent to $86.31 in premarket trading. Shares of Celgene fell 1 percent to $101.60. The two
Biotechnology Immunotherapies Pharmaceuticals

Drug targeting technique could aid therapies for immune diseases

A new technique that targets drugs to specific cells could lead to improved therapies for diseases caused by an overactive immune response. The approach could help people affected by conditions such as arthritis and inflammatory bowel diseases, where the body's own immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissues. Researchers focused on a group of immune cells called macrophages - some of which help the body heal after injury, while others can
Biotechnology cancer Pharmaceuticals

Combination approach improves power of new cancer therapy

An international research team has found a way to improve the anti-cancer effect of a new medicine class called 'Smac mimetics'. The team discovered how a protein called MK2 helps to keep cancer cells alive, making them resistant to the anti-cancer effects of Smac mimetics. The findings provide a rationale for combining inhibitors of MK2 with Smac mimetics as a potentially powerful new combination therapy for cancers with few treatment
Biotechnology cancer Pharmaceuticals

Custom built molecule shows promise as anti-cancer therapy

Scientists at the University of Bath funded by Cancer Research UK have custom-built a molecule which stops breast cancer cells from multiplying in laboratory trials, and hope it will eventually lead to a treatment for the disease. But perhaps even more importantly the method they used to create the molecule has potential to be applied to develop new treatments for a wide range of cancers and other diseases. The team,
Biotechnology Prodrug

New Method for Tapping Vast Plant Pharmacopeia to Make More Effective Drugs

Cocaine, nicotine, capsaicin. These are just three familiar examples of the hundreds of thousands of small molecules (also called specialized or secondary metabolites) that plants use as chemical ammunition to protect themselves from predation. Unfortunately, identifying the networks of genes that plants use to make these biologically active compounds, which are the source of many of the drugs that people use and abuse daily, has vexed scientists for years, hindering