Clinical Trials

Eating Crickets Can Be Good for Your Gut, According to New Clinical Trial

Valerie Stull was 12 when she ate her first insect. “I was on a trip with my parents in Central America and we were served fried ants,” she says. “I remember being so grossed out initially, but when I put the ant in my mouth, I was really surprised because it tasted like food — and it was good!” Today, Stull, a recent doctoral graduate of the University of Wisconsin–Madison Nelson
Biotechnology Infectious Diseases rare diseases

Childhood obesity major link to hip diseases

New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood journal, shows a strong link between childhood obesity and hip diseases in childhood. Significant hip deformities affect around 1 in 500 children. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disease of adolescence. The condition always requires surgery, can cause significant pain, and often leads to a hip replacement in adolescence or early
Biotechnology

Humans have three times more brown body fat

Compared to white fat, brown body fat burns through energy at an extraordinary rate. However, until now the proportion of brown fat in humans was thought to be quite small. Now a study conducted by researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has shown: The quantity of brown fat in humans is three times greater than previously known. As a consequence, new obesity and diabetes drugs that activate brown
Biotechnology Cell Therapy

Botox’s Sweet Tooth Underlies Its Key Neuron-Targeting Mechanism UCI

The Botox toxin has a sweet tooth, and it’s this craving for sugars – glycans, to be exact – that underlies its extreme ability target neuron cells in the body … while giving researchers an approach to neutralize it. A study co-led by Rongsheng Jin, professor of physiology & biophysics at the University of California, Irvine; Min Dong with Boston Children’s Hospital-Harvard Medical School; and Andreas Rummel with the Hannover
cancer Cancer Discovery

UK Study Shows New Potential Marker for Obesity

A new study led by University of Kentucky researchers and published in Nature shows a potential new biological marker for the development of obesity and a possible target for obesity prevention and treatment. Neurotensin (NT), a peptide produced mainly in the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, is released with fat ingestion and facilitates fatty acid absorption in the intestine. Previous research has shown that NT can also stimulate the
Uncategorized

Brain Cells That Aid Appetite Control Identified

It’s rare for scientists to get what they describe as “clean” results without spending a lot of time repeating the same experiment over and over again. But when researchers saw the mice they were working with doubling their weight within a month or two, they knew they were on to something. “About twenty years ago there was a big step forward in our understanding of obesity when researchers discovered that