Biotechnology Breast Cancer cancer Cancer Discovery Cancer screening Clinical Trials genes

New Study Finds Nanoparticles Show Promise in Therapy for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Approximately 10-20 percent of diagnosed breast cancers are found to be triple-negative, meaning the breast cancer cells test negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors as well as HER2 receptors, genes that can play a role in the development of breast cancer. Triple-negative breast cancer can be more aggressive and difficult to treat as the cancer cells do not respond to hormonal therapies or therapies that target HER2 receptors. A new
cancer Cancer Discovery

Polymer Nanoparticle Shows Ability to Locate and Treat Breast Tumors

One major problem in treating cancer is identifying the location of small tumors and treating them before they metastasize. In an effort to overcome that problem, researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have developed a fluorescing nanoparticle capable of finding tumors, lighting up upon arrival and being activated with light to generate heat to destroy the cancer cells. A study in which these nanoparticles – Hybrid Donor-Acceptor Polymer Particles,
cancer

‘Sticky’ Particles Promise More Precise Drug Delivery for Brain Cancer

A Yale research team has found that by tinkering with the surface properties of drug-loaded nanoparticles, they can potentially direct these particles to specific cells in the brain. By making nanoparticles bioadhesive, or “sticky,” the researchers have answered a long-standing question: Once you get the particles to the brain, how do you get them to interact with the cancer cells there? Their findings are published May 19 in Nature Communications.
cancer Immunotherapies

Nanoparticles Reprogram Immune Cells to Fight Cancer

Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have developed biodegradable nanoparticles that can be used to genetically program immune cells to recognize and destroy cancer cells — while the immune cells are still inside the body. In a proof-of-principle study to be published April 17 in Nature Nanotechnology, the team showed that nanoparticle-programmed immune cells, known as T cells, can rapidly clear or slow the progression of leukemia in a
cancer

Drug Combination Delivered by Nanoparticles May Help in Melanoma Treatment

The first of a new class of medication that delivers a combination of drugs by nanoparticle may keep melanoma from becoming resistant to treatment, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. CelePlum-777 combines a special ratio of the drugs Celecoxib, an anti-inflammatory, and Plumbagin, a toxin. By combining the drugs, the cells have difficulty overcoming the effect of having more than one active ingredient. Celecoxib and Plumbagin work together
cancer Cancer Discovery

From Nanotechnology, A Better Prognostic Tool For Brain Cancer

A new nano-fabricated platform for observing brain cancer cells provides a much more detailed look at how the cells migrate and a more accurate post-surgery prognosis for brain cancer (glioblastoma) patients. By creating an environment similar to the one that glioblastoma cells naturally navigate, Yale and Hopkins researchers could accurately predict the clinical outcomes of the 14 brain cancer patients enrolled in a recent study. The results are published today[June9]