Biotechnology Cell Therapy Clinical Trials Immunotherapies stem cells

Dana-Farber researchers report clinical trial results in treatment of leukemia and lymphoma

New results from clinical trials of immunotherapy and experimental targeted agents for patients with leukemia and lymphoma are being presented by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting Dec. 1-4.  Here are summaries of three presentations, including one that compared outcomes of CAR T-cell therapy in patients in clinical trials with outcomes in the “real world” of clinical practice: CAR T-cell treatment provides durable
cancer Immunotherapies

First In-Human Clinical Trial Targeting CD4 Protein for Aggressive T-cell Leukemia and Lymphoma to be Launched

Stony Brook University, iCell Gene Therapeutics, and the University of Louisville, have received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for an Investigational New Drug (IND) for the treatment of relapsed and refractory T-cell leukemia and lymphoma. The approach is the first to use chimeric antigen receptor engineered T-cells directed against the target protein CD4 (CD4CAR). Together, Stony Brook University, the University of Louisville, and iCell Gene Therapeutics expect the first
Biotechnology cancer Cell Therapy

FDA Approves CAR T Therapy for Large B-Cell Lymphoma Developed at University of Pennsylvania

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded approval for a personalized cellular therapy developed at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center, this time for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory large B-Cell lymphoma after two or more lines of systemic therapy. Today’s approval includes treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) – the most common form of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma – as well as high
cancer Cancer Discovery

Heart Failure More Likely for Some Breast Cancer and Lymphoma Survivors

Patients who were treated for breast cancer or lymphoma are more than three times at risk for developing congestive heart failure, compared with patients who did not have cancer. Congestive heart failure is when the heart muscle does not pump blood as well as it should. This research is being presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 67th Annual Scientific Session. The risk of increased heart failure occurred as early as one
Biotechnology cancer Cell Therapy Clinical Trials Gene Therapy

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center Patients Treated with New FDA-Approved CAR T Therapy

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) has been selected as one of the few authorized treatment centers in the United States approved to administer the first FDA- approved chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR T) therapy for treatment of adult patients with a specific type of lymphoma. VICC is the only cancer center in a seven-state region of the Southeast authorized to deliver the new immunotherapy. On Oct. 18, Kite, a Gilead
Biotechnology cancer Immunotherapies

Combination Immune Therapy Shows Promise Against Hodgkin Lymphoma

The combination of two new drugs that harness the body’s immune system is safe and effective, destroying most cancer cells in 64 percent of patients with recurrent Hodgkin lymphoma, according to the results of an early-phase study. Presented Dec. 5 at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in San Diego, the study in 19 patients found that the combination of brentuximab vedotin (marketed as Adcentris) and nivolumab
Biotechnology

Advances in Multiple Myeloma, Lymphoma and Other Hematologic Malignancies Presented at Annual Meeting of American Society of Hematology

Newswise — Researchers from University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine presented significant new research findings in multiple myeloma, lymphoma and other hematologic disorders at the 58th Annual Meeting of American Society of Hematology (ASH) in San Diego. “The breadth and depth of this innovative cancer research presented at ASH is truly outstanding,” says Stan Gerson, MD, Director of UH Seidman Cancer Center and
cancer Genomes

Cancer Sequencing Results Differ Based On Genetic Background Of Comparison Genome

When University of Colorado Cancer Center researcher, Jing Hong Wang, MD, PhD, found more than 1,000 genetic translocations in her mouse model of B cell lymphoma, she assumed her lab had made a mistake. To rule out experimental technique as the cause of the way-more-than-expected genomic alterations, Wang’s lab sequenced three different types of cells from “wildtype” mice – effectively the kind that might move into your garage in bad
cancer Cell Therapy

Blood Cancer Treatment May Age Immune Cells As Much As 30 Years

Certain cancer treatments are known to take a toll on patients, causing side effects like fatigue, nausea and hair loss. Now, scientists are investigating whether some treatments can cause another long-term side effect: premature aging of important disease-fighting cells. University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers, by tracking a molecular marker that has been shown to increase in white blood cells as people age, have uncovered clues that
Biotechnology cancer Cell Therapy

RESEARCHERS DEVELOP NEW STRATEGY TO LIMIT SIDE EFFECTS OF STEM CELL TRANSPLANTS

Scientists in Germany have developed a new approach that may prevent leukemia and lymphoma patients from developing graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) after therapeutic bone marrow transplants. The researchers describe the successful application of their strategy in mice in “Exogenous TNFR2 activation protects from acute GvHD via host T reg cell expansion,” which will be published online August 15 ahead of issue in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. Bone marrow transplants can
cancer

UCLA Research Suggests That Gut Bacteria Could Help Prevent Cancer

Researchers have shown that various types of intestinal bacteria might be factors in both causing and preventing obesity, and in other conditions and diseases. Now, a UCLA study suggests that it could also potentially be used to reduce the risk for some types of cancer. The research, published online April 13 in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS ONE, offers evidence that anti-inflammatory “health beneficial” gut bacteria can slow or stop the