FDA Approves the Roll-Over Combination Study with Checkpoint Inhibitor Immunotherapies to Allow Continued Access to BriaVax™ in Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer

The FDA has approved the roll-over combination study of the investigational breast cancer vaccine, BriaVax™ with pembrolizumab {Keytruda; manufactured by Merck & Co., Inc. or ipilimumab {Yervoy; manufactured by Bristol-Myers Squibb Company for patients previously treated with BriaVax™ from the ongoing Phase I/IIa Clinical Trial in Advanced Breast Cancer.

BriaVax™ is a whole-cell breast cancer vaccine genetically engineered to release granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a substance that activates the immune system by allowing the body to recognize and eliminate cancerous cells by inducing tumor-directed T cell and potentially antibody responses.

This roll-over combination study allows the patients who did not respond to BriaVax™ (monotherapy) treatment to be treated and continue to receive the potential clinical benefits of the vaccine in combination with either pembrolizumab or ipilimumab. This approach is based on the hypothesis that both pembrolizumab and ipilimumab may improve the anti-tumor activity of vaccine in patients with advanced breast cancer. Safety and efficacy data will be evaluated.

“We are very excited to evaluate the effects of BriaVax™ with other approved anti-tumor immunotherapeutic agents. We expect this study to extend and potentiate the clinical benefits of BriaVax™ in advanced breast cancer patients,” stated Dr. Williams, BriaCell’s President & CEO in a press release. “We look forward to expanding our clinical study and exploring potential immunotherapy partnerships with leading pharmaceutical companies in the future, and we are pleased with the FDA decision,” Dr. Williams added.

The clinical investigators will work closely with Cancer Insight, LLC, BriaCell’s contract research organization, to manage the clinical and regulatory aspects of the clinical trial for the roll-over combination study of BriaVax™ on behalf of BriaCell. More information on the roll-over combination study of BriaVax™ with either ipilimumab or pembrolizumab will be available on ClinicalTrials.gov (Study identifier: BRI-ROL-001).

Manufactured by Merck & Co., Inc., KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab) is a prescription medicine that may treat certain cancers by working with the immune system. It has been approved for the treatment of a number of cancer indications excluding breast cancer.

Manufactured by Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, YERVOY® (ipilimumab) is a prescription medicine used in adults and children 12 years and older to treat melanoma (a kind of skin cancer) that has spread (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). It is a monoclonal antibody that works to activate the immune system and enabling them to recognize and destroy cancer cells.

BriaVax™ is a whole-cell breast cancer vaccine genetically engineered to release granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a substance that activates the immune system. Previously, a small Phase I study documented very prompt and near complete regression of metastatic breast cancer deposits in the breast, lung, soft tissue, and even the brain.

The ongoing open-label Phase I/IIa study will evaluate BriaVax™ in up to 40 advanced breast cancer patients. This trial is listed in ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT03066947. The trial is being conducted along with the co-development of BriaDx™, our companion diagnostic test. The interim data for the first 10 patients is expected by the first quarter of 2018.

BriaCell is an immuno-oncology focused biotechnology company developing a targeted and safe approach to the management of cancer. BriaCell’s mission is to serve late-stage cancer patients with no available treatment options.

Immunotherapy has come to the forefront of the fight against cancer, harnessing the body’s own immune system in recognizing and selectively destroying the cancer cells while sparing normal ones. Immunotherapy, in addition to generally being more targeted and less toxic than commonly used types of chemotherapy, is also thought to be a strong type of approach aimed at preventing cancer recurrence.

The results of two previous Phase I clinical trials (one with the precursor cell line not genetically engineered to produce GM-CSF and one with BriaVax™) have been encouraging in patients with advanced breast cancer. Most notably, one patient with metastatic breast cancer responded to BriaVax™ with substantial reduction in tumor burden including lung and brain metastases. The company is currently conducting a Phase I/IIa clinical trial for BriaVax™ in patients with advanced breast cancer whose disease has progressed following at least one prior treatment course.

This trial is listed in ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT03066947.  The trial is being conducted along with the co-development of BriaDx™, our companion diagnostic test. The interim data for the first 10 patients is expected by the first quarter of 2018.

In a previous Phase I setting, a patient with metastatic breast cancer responded to BriaVax™ with objective reduction in tumor burden. To expand on this finding, after updating the clinical protocol of the original investigational new drug (IND) application, an open-label Phase I/IIa clinical trial enrolling up to 40 late stage breast cancer patients with recurrent and/or metastatic disease has been launched. Patients will be administered BriaVax™ every two weeks for the first month of treatment, then monthly up to one year.

The primary objective of the Phase I/IIa clinical trial is to evaluate the safety of BriaVax™ in study subjects, and the principal secondary objective is an evaluation of the tumor size reduction. Tumor response will be monitored every three months during the study. The trial will also evaluate progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS).

For additional details regarding the clinical trial, please visit:
https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03066947

FDA Halts Three Multiple Myeloma Studies Evaluating Merck’s KEYTRUDA®

Merck known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has placed a clinical hold on KEYNOTE-183, KEYNOTE-185 and KEYNOTE-023, three combination studies of KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab), the company’s anti-PD-1 therapy, in the blood cancer multiple myeloma.

This decision follows a review of data by the Data Monitoring Committee in which more deaths were observed in the KEYTRUDA arms of KEYNOTE-183 and KEYNOTE-185 and which led to the pause in new patient enrollment, as announced on June 12, 2017. The FDA has determined that the data available at the present time indicate that the risks of KEYTRUDA plus pomalidomide or lenalidomide outweigh any potential benefit for patients with multiple myeloma. All patients enrolled in KEYNOTE-183 and KEYNOTE-185 and those in the KEYTRUDA/lenalidomide/dexamethasone cohort in KEYNOTE-023 will discontinue investigational treatment with KEYTRUDA.

This clinical hold does not apply to other studies with KEYTRUDA.

The following studies have been placed on full clinical hold:

  • KEYNOTE-183: “A Phase III study of Pomalidomide and low-dose Dexamethasone with or without Pembrolizumab (MK3475) in refractory or relapsed and refractory Multiple Myeloma (KEYNOTE-183).”
  • KEYNOTE-185: “A Phase III study of Lenalidomide and low-dose Dexamethasone with or without Pembrolizumab (MK3475) in newly diagnosed and treatment naïve Multiple Myeloma (KEYNOTE-185).”

The following study has been placed on partial clinical hold:

  • KEYNOTE-023 Cohort 1: “A Phase I Multi-Cohort Trial of Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in Combination with Backbone Treatments for Subjects with Multiple Myeloma (KEYNOTE 023).” Cohort 1 of KEYNOTE-023 evaluated KEYTRUDA (pembrolizumab) in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone in patients who received prior anti-multiple myeloma treatment with an immunomodulatory (IMiD) treatment (lenalidomide, pomalidomide or thalidomide).

“Patient safety is Merck’s primary concern, and we are grateful to the study investigators and patients involved in these studies for their commitment to this important research,” said Dr. Roger M. Perlmutter, president, Merck Research Laboratories. “Merck’s development program for KEYTRUDA, spanning more than 30 different tumor types, has one priority: helping patients suffering from cancer.”

For more information about Merck’s oncology clinical trials, visit www.merck.com/clinicaltrials.

New Ovarian Cancer Immunotherapy Study Poses Question: Can Microbiome Influence Treatment Response?

Roswell Park Study with pembrolizumab in untried combination is first ovarian cancer clinical trial to incorporate gut flora analysis

A new clinical study underway at Roswell Park Cancer Institute is the first to test the combination of the immunotherapy pembrolizumab with two other drugs as treatment for recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer, and is also the first ovarian cancer clinical trial to incorporate analysis of patients’ microbiomes — the bacteria present in the human gut and other organs.

This new study, led by Principal Investigator Emese Zsiros, MD, PhD, FACOG, Assistant Professor of Oncology in Roswell Park’s Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Center for Immunotherapy, is a phase II clinical trial that will enroll approximately 40 patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer, and will evaluate the impact of the combination of the PD1-targeting antibody pembrolizumab (Keytruda) with intravenous bevacizumab (Avastin) and oral cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) on antitumor immune responses and on progression-free survival.

Pembrolizumab has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treatment of advanced melanoma, some metastatic non-small cell lung cancers and recurrent squamous cell head/neck carcinoma, but has only been tested in a small number of ovarian cancer patients, as a single drug and showing modest response. The investigators say a strong scientific rationale supports their hypothesis that the combination of pembrolizumab with two other drugs that have already been approved to treat ovarian cancer — bevacizumab and low-dose oral cyclophosphamide — may have much broader benefit for patients.

“Our biggest hope is that by trying these three drugs in combination, we can significantly extend the lives of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer. We also hope to minimize the side effects associated with chemotherapy drugs, and to markedly improve the quality of our patients’ lives,” says Dr. Zsiros. “We will be looking at potential biomarkers that will tell us who can most benefit from this therapy combination and to better understand how cancer cells and immune cells communicate with one another so that we can design better medications to kill cancer efficiently.“

As part of this study, the clinical team will analyze blood, tumor, stool, vaginal and skin microbiome samples, looking to identify possible associations between these markers with clinical outcomes and tumor response. The study, which is supported by a grant from Merck & Co. Inc., maker of pembrolizumab, will be one of the first to analyze these bacteria to determine possible associations with response to immunotherapeutic agents in patients with cancer.

“We’re looking at how to improve our immune defenses to cancer, but we’re looking at it from a variety of angles,” says Dr. Zsiros. “There’s a whole new area of research suggesting that what’s going on in our gut, our gut flora, has a huge influence on your overall health and happiness, and this study will extend that work into some new directions.”

According to the National Cancer Institute, epithelial ovarian cancer is one of the most common gynecologic malignancies, and is the fifth most frequent cause of cancer death in women.