age-related decline

How summer and diet damage your DNA, and what you can do

  Today, your body will accumulate quadrillions of new injuries in your DNA. The constant onslaught of many forms of damage, some of which permanently mutates your genes, could initiate cancer and prove fatal. Yet all is not doomed: The lives we lead determine how well our cells can handle this daily molecular erosion. Certain cells are particularly at risk. Your skin, for instance, is constantly being bombarded by high-energy
Cardiology

Heart Attack Risk on the Rise for Pregnant Women and Death Rate Remains High

The risk of having a heart attack while pregnant, giving birth, or during the two months after delivery, continues to increase for American women, a new study finds. As published online July 18 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, the study, led by NYU School of Medicine researchers, found that the risk of suffering a heart attack among pregnant women rose 25 percent from 2002 to 2014. The researchers suggest that the
Biotechnology

South Asian-Americans at Higher Risk for Heart Disease and Stroke

South Asians living in the United States are more likely to die of heart conditions caused by atherosclerosis, such as heart attacks and strokes, than East Asians and non-Hispanic whites in the U.S. Clinical experts at Rush University Medical Center reported this finding in a new scientific statement they co-authored that is being published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. Atherosclerosis is a disease in which the arteries become narrowed
stem cells

UIC Researchers Create Heart Cells to Study AFib

University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have discovered a way turn pluripotent stem cells into atrial cells, which make up the upper chambers, or atria, of the heart. The discovery will enable them to better study atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm disorder also known as AFib, which originates in the heart’s atria. As reported in the journal Stem Cell Reports, the researchers obtained blood cells from healthy volunteers, activated genes to
Cardiology

Individuals with HIV at Higher Risk for Heart Disease

A review of more than 80 studies reveals that changes in the immune cells of people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection may increase their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The review is published in the journal Physiology. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) consists of a “cocktail” of several drugs that work together to reduce the amount of detectable virus (viral load) in the bloodstream. Since the development of this combination treatment approach more
stem cells

‘Decorated’ Stem Cells Could Offer Targeted Heart Repair

Although cardiac stem cell therapy is a promising treatment for heart attack patients, directing the cells to the site of an injury – and getting them to stay there – remains challenging. In a new pilot study using an animal model, North Carolina State University researcher Ke Cheng and his team show that “decorating” cardiac stem cells with platelet nanovesicles can increase the stem cells’ ability to find and remain
Biotechnology Cell Therapy Clinical Trials Heart Health

Immune Cells Mistake Heart Attacks for Viral Infections

A study led by Kevin King, a bioengineer and physician at the University of California San Diego, has found that the immune system plays a surprising role in the aftermath of heart attacks.  The research could lead to new therapeutic strategies for heart disease. The team, which also includes researchers from the Center for Systems Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the
Biotechnology Diabetes

Higher BMI linked with increased risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, type 2 diabetes

Results of a new study add to the evidence of an association between higher body mass index (BMI) and increased risk of cardiometabolic diseases such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology. A connection between higher BMI and cardiometabolic disease risk usually arise from observational studies that are unable to fully account for confounding by shared risk factors. Mendelian randomization (a
Cardiology

New Study Finds Potential Breakthrough in Determining Who’s at Risk for Heart Attacks

Researchers are revisiting their views on the relative dangers soft and hard atherosclerotic plaque deposits pose to heart health. Findings of a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute may be a “game-changer” for determining who’s at risk of a heart attack, they say. The notion that soft plaque is more likely to rupture and cause heart attacks than hard calcium deposits in coronary arteries may
Cardiology Cell Therapy Genomes

Stem Cell Breakthrough Unlocks Mysteries Associated With Inherited And Sometimes Lethal Heart Conditions

Using advanced stem cell technology, scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have created a model of a heart condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) — an excessive thickening of the heart that is associated with a number of rare and common illnesses, some of which have a strong genetic component. The stem cell lines scientists created in the lab, which are believed to closely resemble human heart
Cardiology

George Washington University Researchers Receive $1.6 Million to Improve Cardiac Function During Heart Failure

Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) received $1.6 million from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to study a heart-brain connection that could help the nearly 23 million people suffering from heart failure worldwide. The four-year project will study ways to restore parasympathetic activity to the heart through oxytocin neuron activation, which could improve cardiac function during heart failure. A distinctive hallmark of heart failure is autonomic imbalance,
Cardiology

Mouse Study Links Heart Regeneration to Telomere Length

Researchers at the Spanish National Center for Cardiovascular Research have discovered that the ends of heart muscle cell chromosomes rapidly erode after birth, limiting the cells’ ability to proliferate and replace damaged heart tissue. The study, “Postnatal telomere dysfunction induces cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest through p21 activation,” which will be published online May 30 in The Journal of Cell Biology, suggests potential new interventions to boost the heart’s capacity to repair
Cardiology

A Personalized Virtual Heart Predicts the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

When electrical waves in the heart run amok in a condition called arrhythmia, sudden death can occur. To save the life of a patient at risk, doctors currently implant a small defibrillator to sense the onset of arrhythmia and jolt the heart back to a normal rhythm. But a thorny question remains: How should doctors decide which patients truly need an invasive, costly electrical implant that is not without health
Cardiology

Study Shows How Different People Respond to Aspirin — an Important Cardioprotective Drug

Researchers have learned new information about how different people respond to aspirin, a globally prescribed drug in cardioprotection. The research team, led by scientists at Cardiff University in the United Kingdom and including representatives from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of Colorado, identified more than 5,600 lipids — or fats — in blood platelets and gained new insights into how these cells respond to aspirin. “Aspirin
Biotechnology Cardiology

In Child Heart Patients, a Novel Approach Improves Symptoms of Hazardous Lymph Blockage

Pediatric researchers have devised an innovative, safe and minimally invasive procedure that helps relieve rare but potentially life-threatening airway blockages occurring in children who had surgery for congenital heart defects. The physician-researchers developed new imaging tools and used minimally invasive catheterization techniques to treat plastic bronchitis, a condition in which abnormal circulation causes lymphatic fluid to dry into solid casts that clog a child’s airways. The authors reported their retrospective