Cardiology

Heart Attack Risk on the Rise for Pregnant Women and Death Rate Remains High

The risk of having a heart attack while pregnant, giving birth, or during the two months after delivery, continues to increase for American women, a new study finds. As published online July 18 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, the study, led by NYU School of Medicine researchers, found that the risk of suffering a heart attack among pregnant women rose 25 percent from 2002 to 2014. The researchers suggest that the
Cardiology

Cedars-Sinai-Led Study Suggest Ways to Improve Therapies for Heart Attacks and Stroke

Investigators have identified a new cellular pathway that may help explain how arterial inflammation develops into atherosclerosis—deposits of cholesterol, fats and other substances that create plaque, clog arteries and promote heart attacks and stroke. The findings could lead to improved therapies for atherosclerosis, a leading cause of death worldwide. "We have known for decades that atherosclerosis is a disease of chronic inflammation that ultimately results in the scarring of arteries
Biotechnology

South Asian-Americans at Higher Risk for Heart Disease and Stroke

South Asians living in the United States are more likely to die of heart conditions caused by atherosclerosis, such as heart attacks and strokes, than East Asians and non-Hispanic whites in the U.S. Clinical experts at Rush University Medical Center reported this finding in a new scientific statement they co-authored that is being published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. Atherosclerosis is a disease in which the arteries become narrowed
Biotechnology Heart Health Regenerative Medicine

Resolvin D-1 Limits Kidney Damage After Heart Attacks

A heart attack triggers an acute inflammatory response at the damaged portion of the heart’s left ventricle. If this acute inflammation lingers, it can lead to stretching of the ventricle and heart failure. The inflammation can claim another victim — the kidneys. New research shows that a bioactive compound called resolvin D-1, injected as a therapeutic dose, is able to limit this collateral damage in the kidneys, as tested in
Biotechnology Cell Therapy Clinical Trials

A Protein Could Make Stem Cell Therapy for Heart Attack Damage More Effective

Researchers may have found a way to reduce ongoing heart damage that occurs long after a severe heart attack by improving the longevity of stem cells injected into the heart. The new study shows that a protein infused into the bloodstream, can improve the healing properties of stem cell therapy in animal models of the disease. “The research could eventually make stem-cell therapy a more viable option for treating long-term
Cardiology

Vitamin D3 Could Help Heal or Prevent Cardiovascular Damage -Study

A new study conducted by Ohio University scientists suggests that a little more sunlight might help restore damage to your cardiovascular system. The study shows that Vitamin D3 - which is made by the body naturally when skin is exposed to the sun - can significantly restore the damage to the cardiovascular system caused by several diseases, including hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Vitamin D3 supplements are also available over-the-counter. The
Biotechnology Cell Therapy Clinical Trials Heart Health

Immune Cells Mistake Heart Attacks for Viral Infections

A study led by Kevin King, a bioengineer and physician at the University of California San Diego, has found that the immune system plays a surprising role in the aftermath of heart attacks.  The research could lead to new therapeutic strategies for heart disease. The team, which also includes researchers from the Center for Systems Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the
Heart Health Strokes

Study: Breastfeeding Moms May Be at Lower Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke

We have known for a long time that breastfeeding is healthy for babies; however studies have shown that it can provide long term health benefits for the moms too. This new information comes from recent research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. The comprehensive study followed 300,000 adult women in China. Previous studies showed different health benefits from breastfeeding were short term including lower cholesterol, blood pressure,
Cardiology

New Study Finds Potential Breakthrough in Determining Who’s at Risk for Heart Attacks

Researchers are revisiting their views on the relative dangers soft and hard atherosclerotic plaque deposits pose to heart health. Findings of a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute may be a “game-changer” for determining who’s at risk of a heart attack, they say. The notion that soft plaque is more likely to rupture and cause heart attacks than hard calcium deposits in coronary arteries may
Biotechnology Uncategorized

Tissue Engineering Advance Reduces Heart Failure in Model of Heart Attack

Researchers have grown heart tissue by seeding a mix of human cells onto a 1-micron-resolution scaffold made with a 3-D printer. The cells organized themselves in the scaffold to create engineered heart tissue that beats synchronously in culture. When the human-derived heart muscle patch was surgically placed onto a mouse heart after a heart attack, it significantly improved heart function and decreased the amount of dead heart tissue. “Our novel
Cardiology Neurology

New Study Finds Cardiac PET/CT Imaging Effective In Detecting Calcium Blockages, Assessing Heart Attack Risk

Many people who experience chest pain but don’t have a heart attack breathe a big sigh of relief when a stress test comes back negative for blockages in their blood vessels. But a new study by cardiac researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City found they may not be off the hook after all. Researchers studied 658 men and women between the ages of 57
Cardiology

George Washington University Researchers Receive $1.6 Million to Improve Cardiac Function During Heart Failure

Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) received $1.6 million from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to study a heart-brain connection that could help the nearly 23 million people suffering from heart failure worldwide. The four-year project will study ways to restore parasympathetic activity to the heart through oxytocin neuron activation, which could improve cardiac function during heart failure. A distinctive hallmark of heart failure is autonomic imbalance,
Cardiology

Mouse Study Links Heart Regeneration to Telomere Length

Researchers at the Spanish National Center for Cardiovascular Research have discovered that the ends of heart muscle cell chromosomes rapidly erode after birth, limiting the cells’ ability to proliferate and replace damaged heart tissue. The study, “Postnatal telomere dysfunction induces cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest through p21 activation,” which will be published online May 30 in The Journal of Cell Biology, suggests potential new interventions to boost the heart’s capacity to repair