Clinical Trials

Higher Risk of Fracture in Type 1 diabetes may be linked to poor Blood Sugar Control

Patients with type 1 diabetes and poor blood sugar control face a higher risk of fragility fracture—any fall from standing height or less that results in a broken bone—than type 1 diabetes patients with good blood sugar control, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.Diabetes affects an estimated 30 million Americans. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the disease and occurs
Environmental Health

Mixed chemicals in beauty products may harm women’s hormones

As we go about our daily lives, we are exposed to many different chemicals that could have negative effects on our hormones. These hormonal changes have been linked to several adverse health outcomes such as breast cancer and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, understanding chemicals that influence hormone levels is important for public health--and particularly for women's health--since their exposure to these chemicals is often higher due to their presence in beauty
age-related decline

Thyroid Gene Variation May Increase Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease in African Americans

African Americans with a common genetic variation are at increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease, while European Americans with the same variation are not, according to a study led by researchers at Rush University Medical Center. They published the study results in the February 22 online issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. The genetic variation, known as Thr92AlaD2 polymorphism, affects a gene involved in the activation of
cancer Cell Therapy

Promising new therapeutic approach for debilitating bone disease

An Australian-led research team has demonstrated a new therapeutic approach that can re-build and strengthen bone, offering hope for individuals with the debilitating bone cancer, multiple myeloma. The findings were published today in the medical journal Blood, and were presented at an international meeting of bone biology experts in Brisbane earlier this month. The researchers tested a new type of treatment that specifically targets a protein called sclerostin, which in healthy
Biotechnology Clinical Trials

Pre-Clinical Study Suggests Parkinson’s Could Start in Gut Endocrine Cells

Recent research on Parkinson’s disease has focused on the gut-brain connection, examining patients’ gut bacteria, and even how severing the vagus nerve connecting the stomach and brain might protect some people from the debilitating disease. But scientists understand little about what’s happening in the gut -- the ingestion of environmental toxins or germs, perhaps -- that leads to brain damage and the hallmarks of Parkinson’s such as tremors, stiffness and
Clinical Trials Diabetes Prodrug

Diabetes drug prevents stiffening of heart muscle in obese mouse model

Overconsumption of a Western diet high in fats and refined sugars has contributed to a global increase in obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Obese and diabetic premenopausal women are more at risk of developing heart disease -- even more than men of similar age and with similar health issues. A study by researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine found that the diabetes medication linagliptin can protect against
cancer Cancer Discovery

UK Study Shows New Potential Marker for Obesity

A new study led by University of Kentucky researchers and published in Nature shows a potential new biological marker for the development of obesity and a possible target for obesity prevention and treatment. Neurotensin (NT), a peptide produced mainly in the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, is released with fat ingestion and facilitates fatty acid absorption in the intestine. Previous research has shown that NT can also stimulate the