cancer Cancer Discovery

Liver Transplant Patients Have Higher Prevalence of Colon Cancer and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

 Liver transplant patients over time experience an increasing trend toward colon cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, according to an award-winning study led by a Loyola Medicine gastroenterologist. The study by Ayokunle Abegunde, MD, MSc, and colleagues also found that lung and heart transplant patients have a higher trend toward non-melanoma skin cancer. Dr. Abegunde was the senior author of the study, presented during the American College of Gastroenterology annual conference in Philadelphia.
cancer Cancer Discovery Cancer screening

Vaccine, Checkpoint Drugs Combination Shows Promise for Pancreatic Cancers

 Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center discovered a combination of a cancer vaccine with two checkpoint drugs reduced pancreatic cancer tumors in mice, demonstrating a possible pathway for treatment of people with pancreatic cancers whose response to standard immunotherapy is poor. Results of the experiments combining an immune system booster vaccine called PancVAX with two checkpoint drugs derived from anti-PD-1 and agonist OX40 antibodies were published in the
Biotechnology

Malnutrition Common in Children with Crohn’s Disease Increases Risk For Post-Operative Complications

Results of a medical records study of children with Crohn’s disease by Johns Hopkins researchers have added substantial evidence for a strong and direct link between malnutrition and increased risk of surgical complications and poor outcomes. The investigators say children with Crohn’s disease were selected for the data analysis because a common hallmark of their disease is malnutrition, and surgery is often used to treat it. But they say their
cancer Cancer Discovery

Loss of Tight Junction Protein Promotes Development of Precancerous Cells

Tight junctions are multi-protein complexes that serve as barriers in epithelial tissues such as the skin or lining of the gut. Loss of a specific tight junction barrier protein, claudin 18, occurs in the majority of gastric cancer patients and is correlated with poor prognosis in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Understanding how claudin 18 loss occurs and what pathways it regulates may provide new strategies to inhibit neoplastic progression
Biotechnology

Hopkins Researchers Use Endoscope to Deliver Gene Therapy in Animal Study

Fixing or replacing faulty genes has emerged as a key to unlocking cures for numerous devastating diseases. But if the new, engineered genes can’t find their way into the patient’s genomic sequence, they won’t help. Johns Hopkins gastroenterologists Florin Selaru and Vivek Kumbhari believe they’ve taken a major step in the direction of helping patients with certain liver disorders by using an increasingly common endoscopic procedure to deliver therapeutic genes to the liver via
cancer Cancer Discovery

Queen’s Researchers Discover Ground-Breaking Process Which Destroys Bowel Cancer Cells

Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast have discovered a ground-breaking therapeutic process that can target and kill bowel cancer cells, which may improve survival rates for bowel cancer patients globally. The research, which has been published in the prestigious journal of Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, is deemed the first of its kind with the discovery of a novel treatment strategy for bowel cancer patients who originally present with an extremely poor survival outcome.  The
cancer Cancer Discovery

Removing the Most Common p53 Mutation in Colorectal Cancer Halts Disease Progression

A Stony Brook pathologist and colleagues publish findings in Cancer Cell By genetically manipulating and removing the most common mutant form of the p53 gene that promotes colorectal cancer in humans, an international team of scientists demonstrated that this therapy reduces tumor growth and tissue invasion. Led by Ute Moll, MD, Professor and cancer biologist in the Department of Pathology at Stony Brook University School of Medicine, the findings are published
Clinical Trials

Eating Crickets Can Be Good for Your Gut, According to New Clinical Trial

Valerie Stull was 12 when she ate her first insect. “I was on a trip with my parents in Central America and we were served fried ants,” she says. “I remember being so grossed out initially, but when I put the ant in my mouth, I was really surprised because it tasted like food — and it was good!” Today, Stull, a recent doctoral graduate of the University of Wisconsin–Madison Nelson
Infectious Diseases

Immune Cells That Create and Sustain Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Disease Identified

These immune cells could become therapeutic targets to treat Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. In preclinical experiments, Laurie Harrington, Ph.D., and colleagues at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have discovered a subset of immune cells that create and sustain chronic inflammatory bowel disease. These cells could become potential therapeutic targets to ameliorate or cure Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Furthermore, if this subset of CD4 T cells plays a similar role
cancer

Deadly Cancers Show Early, Detectable Differences From Benign Tumors

Do metastatic cancer tumors “break bad” or are they “born bad”? This question is an essential mystery in cancer early detection and treatment. Lacking a clear answer, patients are given the same aggressive therapies when small, abnormal clusters of cells are discovered early, even though they might well be harmless. In a study publishing the week of May 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a research team
cancer Cancer Discovery

Simultaneous Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy May Be Better for Some Metastatic Bladder Cancer Patients

Researchers from Mount Sinai and Sema4, a health information company and Mount Sinai venture, have discovered that giving metastatic bladder cancer patients simultaneous chemotherapy and immunotherapy is safe and that patients whose tumors have certain genetic mutations may respond particularly well to this combination approach, according to the results of a clinical trial published in European Urology. Though chemotherapy and immunotherapy have become standard options for the treatment of metastatic bladder
Alzheimers and Dementia

Researchers Identify Epigenetic Orchestrator of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

Genentech researchers have identified an enzyme that shifts pancreatic cancer cells to a more aggressive, drug-resistant state by epigenetically modifying the cells’ chromatin. The study, which will be published December 11 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that targeting this enzyme could make pancreatic cancer cells more vulnerable to existing therapies that currently have only limited effect against this deadly form of cancer. The vast majority of cancers originate in
Biotechnology

Immune Cells Produce Wound Healing Factor, Could Lead To New IBD Treatment

Specific immune cells have the ability to produce a healing factor that can promote wound repair in the intestine, a finding that could lead to new, potential therapeutic treatments for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a new research study. The research team, led by Georgia State University and the University of Michigan, wanted to understand how a wound heals in the intestine because in IBD, which includes Crohn’s disease
Biotechnology cancer Cancer Discovery

Precision Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

Precision medicine’s public face is that of disease — and better treatments for that disease through targeted therapies. But precision medicine has an unsung partner that could affect the lives of many more people: Precision prevention — a reflection of the growing realization that preventing cancer and other diseases may not be one-size-fits-all. “Precision medicine has been kind of a buzzword recently, but often when people think about precision medicine,