Biotechnology

Scientists identify new fuel-delivery route for cells

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a previously unknown route for cellular fuel delivery, a finding that could shed light on the process of aging and the chronic diseases that often accompany it. With age, cells gradually lose their ability to take in and process fuel. A cell that can't fill its fuel tank, so to speak, can't perform its proper functions. Researchers are
Biotechnology cancer Cancer Discovery Cell Therapy drug development

Anti-Malaria Drugs Have Shown Promise in Treating Cancer, and Now Researchers Know Why

Anti-malaria drugs known as chloroquines have been repurposed to treat cancer for decades, but until now no one knew exactly what the chloroquines were targeting when they attack a tumor. Now, researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania say they have identified that target – an enzyme called PPT1 – opening up a new pathway for potential cancer treatments. The team also used CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing
Biotechnology

Scientists Develop Method to Tweak Tiny ‘Antenna’ on Cells

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan say they have found a fast way to manipulate a cell’s cilia, the tiny, fingerlike protrusions that “feel” and sense their microscopic environment. The experiments, performed in mouse cells, may advance scientists’ efforts to not only understand how the nanosized antennae work, but also how to repair them. A report of their findings appeared online April 30
Biotechnology cancer Cell Therapy

Drug Reduces Size of Some Lung Cancer Tumors, Relapse Rate After Surgery

A drug given to early stage lung cancer patients before they undergo surgery showed major tumor responses in the removed tumor and an increase in anti-tumor T-cells that remained after the tumor was removed, which resulted in fewer relapse cases in the patients. The research teams at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, the Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center wanted to
Cell Therapy

Extracellular vesicles could be personalized drug delivery vehicles

Creating enough nanovesicles to inexpensively serve as a drug delivery system may be as simple as putting the cells through a sieve, according to an international team of researchers who used mouse autologous -- their own -- immune cells to create large amounts of fillable nanovesicles to deliver drugs to tumors in mice. Nanovesicles are tiny sacs released by cells that carry chemical messages between cells. These nanovesicles are natural
Cell Therapy

Placenta-based Cell Therapy Improves Hematopoietic Transplantation as Reported in Scientific Journal Frontiers in Medicine

Frontiers in Medicine has published key findings from a study of PLX-R18, a cell-based therapy using human placenta, demonstrated the cells’ efficacy in improving human hematopoietic engraftment. The article titled, “Posttransplant Intramuscular Injection of PLX-R18 Mesenchymal-Like Adherent Stromal Cells Improves Human Hematopoietic Engraftment in A Murine Transplant Model” was published in the peer-reviewed journal’s February 2018 issue. In the published study, mice were injected intramuscularly (IM) with PLX-R18 following human
Biotechnology Cell Therapy Immunotherapies Uncategorized

Immune cells may heal bleeding brain after strokes

While immune cells called neutrophils are known to act as infantry in the body's war on germs, a National Institutes of Health-funded study suggests they can act as medics as well. By studying rodents, researchers showed that instead of attacking germs, some neutrophils may help heal the brain after an intracerebral hemorrhage, a form of stroke caused by ruptured blood vessels. The study suggests that two neutrophil-related proteins may play
Neurodegenerative diseases

Tiny Nanopackages Built Out of DNA Help Scientists Peek at How Neurons Work

A team of scientists from the University of Chicago designed a way to use microscopic capsules made out of DNA to deliver a payload of tiny molecules directly into a cell. The technique, detailed Aug. 21 in Nature Nanotechnology, gives scientists an opportunity to understand certain interactions among cells that have previously been hard to track. “It’s really a molecular platform,” said Yamuna Krishnan, professor in chemistry and co-author of
Biotechnology Uncategorized

UW Scientists Find Key Cues to Regulate Bone-Building Cells

The prospect of regenerating bone lost to cancer or trauma is a step closer to the clinic as University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have identified two proteins found in bone marrow as key regulators of the master cells responsible for making new bone. In a study published online today (Feb. 2, 2017) in the journal Stem Cell Reports, a team of UW-Madison scientists reports that the proteins govern the activity of
Biotechnology rare diseases

Penn Study Identifies Potent Inhibitor of Zika Entry Into Human Cells

A panel of small molecules that inhibit Zika virus infection, including one that stands out as a potent inhibitor of Zika viral entry into relevant human cell types, was discovered by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Publishing in Cell Reports this week, a team led by Sara Cherry, PhD, an associate professor of Microbiology, screened a library of 2,000 bioactive compounds for their
Cell Therapy Neurodegenerative diseases Neurology

Brain Cell ‘Executioner’ Identified

Despite their different triggers, the same molecular chain of events appears to be responsible for brain cell death from strokes, injuries and even such neurodegenerative diseases as Alzheimer's. Now, researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have pinpointed the protein at the end of that chain of events, one that delivers the fatal strike by carving up a cell's DNA. The find, they say, potentially opens up a new avenue for
Biotechnology Diabetes

Sernova Tackles both Diabetes and Hemophilia with one Technology

contributed by Richard (Rick) Mills Editor, Ahead of the Herd As a general rule, the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information. Paul Lacey was a researcher at Washington University when, in 1972, he cured some diabetic rats by transplanting the islet cells from healthy rats into diabetic ones. Over the next two decades researchers made many attempts to apply the procedure to humans.
Biotechnology Cell Therapy Clinical Trials Genomes

Cell Transplant Treats Parkinson’s in Mice Under Control of Designer Drug

A University of Wisconsin-Madison neuroscientist has inserted a genetic switch into nerve cells so a patient can alter their activity by taking designer drugs that would not affect any other cell. The cells in question are neurons and make the neurotransmitter dopamine, whose deficiency is the culprit in the widespread movement disorder Parkinson's disease. Dopamine is a brain chemical essential for coordinated movement. Dopamine replacement, a standard therapy for Parkinson's