Biotechnology Cell Therapy stem cells

Stem Cell Signal Drives New Bone Building

In experiments in rats and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that a cellular protein signal that drives both bone and fat formation in selected stem cells can be manipulated to favor bone building. If harnessed in humans, they say, the protein — known as WISP-1 — could help fractures heal faster, speed surgical recovery and possibly prevent bone loss due to aging, injury
Biotechnology

Promising New Targeted Therapy for Acceleration of Bone Fracture Repair

 There are over six million fractures per year in the U.S. with direct costs in the billions, not to mention lost productivity.  The only drug currently available to accelerate the healing process must be applied directly onto the fracture surface during surgery, but not all breaks require such intervention. New research, Bone Fracture-Targeted Dasatinib Conjugate Potently Enhances Fracture Repair In Vivo, presented today at the 2018 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) PharmSci 360 Meeting highlights a novel
Biotechnology Uncategorized

UW Scientists Find Key Cues to Regulate Bone-Building Cells

The prospect of regenerating bone lost to cancer or trauma is a step closer to the clinic as University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have identified two proteins found in bone marrow as key regulators of the master cells responsible for making new bone. In a study published online today (Feb. 2, 2017) in the journal Stem Cell Reports, a team of UW-Madison scientists reports that the proteins govern the activity of
Arthritis

The Search for Better Bone Replacement: 3-D Printed Bone with Just the Right Mix of Ingredients

To make a good framework for filling in missing bone, mix at least 30 percent pulverized natural bone with some special man-made plastic and create the needed shape with a 3-D printer. That’s the recipe for success reported by researchers at The Johns Hopkins University in a paper published April 18 online in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering. Each year, the Johns Hopkins scientists say, birth defects, trauma or surgery