cancer Cancer Discovery Cancer screening

Investigational Drug Shows Promising Results in Phase II Study of Aggressive, Often Fatal Blood Disorder with No Approved Therapies

A Phase I/II study, led by investigators at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, reports an investigational drug called tagraxofusp has demonstrated high response rates in patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN), a rare but highly aggressive – and often fatal bone marrow and blood disorder – for which there are no existing approved therapies. Findings from the study are being presented Dec. 3 at the 60th American Society of
cancer Cancer Discovery Cancer screening Immunotherapies

Immunotherapy combination and chemotherapy show encouraging results in Phase II acute myeloid leukemia study

 A triple therapy combining two immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICPIs) with the standard-of-care chemotherapy, a hypomethylating agent called azacitidine, has shown promising results for treatment of relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to findings from a Phase II study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Findings from the study, led by Naval Daver, M.D., associate professor of Leukemia, are being presented at the 60th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting & Exposition in San Diego. The
cancer Cancer Discovery Cancer screening

Combination chemotherapy and immunotherapy effective in Phase II leukemia study

A combination of the standard-of-care chemotherapy drug known as azacitidine, with nivolumab, an immune checkpoint inhibitor, demonstrated an encouraging response rate and overall survival in patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) according to findings from a Phase II study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Results from the trial, led by Naval Daver, M.D., associate professor of Leukemia, were published in the Nov. 8 online issue of Cancer Discovery. The study followed 70 patients
cancer Clinical Trials drug development Surgery

Neoadjuvant Combination Checkpoint Blockade Trial Yields High Response Rates for Patients with High-Risk Stage 3 Melanoma

Combination checkpoint blockade before surgery (neoadjuvant therapy) produced a high response rate among patients with high-risk stage 3 melanoma, with nearly half having no sign of disease at surgery, but a high incidence of side effects caused the trial to be closed early. The phase II study was led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Results of the study, the first randomized neoadjuvant clinical trial
Neurology Neuroscience

Hypertension Drugs Could Prevent Memory Loss in Lupus Patients, Study Suggests

Researchers from The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have discovered that the activation of brain cells called microglia likely contributes to the memory loss and other cognitive impairments suffered by many patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The study, which will be published September 5 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that ACE inhibitors—a class of drugs commonly used to treat hypertension—can block this process in mice and might therefore
Cancer Discovery

A blood test can predict early lung cancer prognosis

Cancer cells obtained from a blood test may be able to predict how early-stage lung cancer patients will fare, a team from the University of Michigan has shown. This information could be used to determine which patients are most likely to benefit from additional therapies to head off the spread of the cancer to other areas of the body. With a new single cell analysis service in U-M's Comprehensive Cancer
Biotechnology Diabetes

Sernova Tackles both Diabetes and Hemophilia with one Technology

contributed by Richard (Rick) Mills Editor, Ahead of the Herd As a general rule, the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information. Paul Lacey was a researcher at Washington University when, in 1972, he cured some diabetic rats by transplanting the islet cells from healthy rats into diabetic ones. Over the next two decades researchers made many attempts to apply the procedure to humans.