cancer Cancer Discovery

“Hijacked” Cell Response to Stress Reveals Promising Drug Targets for Blood Cancer

A signaling pathway that helps promote normal cell growth worsens a form of leukemia by taking control of another pathway better known for protecting cells from biological stress, a new study shows. The discovery that the NOTCH1 pathway takes control of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) signaling in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or T-ALL, suggests that blocking one or more genes in the HSF1 pathway could represent a
cancer Cancer Discovery

New CAR T Case Study Shows Promise in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-cell therapy, also known as CAR T therapy, was named the biggest research breakthrough of 2017 by the American Society of Clinical Oncology. The personal gene therapy utilizes a patient’s own immune cells to fight cancer. The Food and Drug Administration has approved CAR T therapy products for adults with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and pediatric and young adults suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Now, researchers at
cancer Cancer Discovery

Multiple Sclerosis Drug Could Reduce Painful Side Effects of Common Cancer Treatment, Researchers Suggest

Researchers from the Saint Louis University School of Medicine have discovered why many multiple myeloma patients experience severe pain when treated with the anticancer drug bortezomib. The study, which will be published April 27 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that a drug already approved to treat multiple sclerosis could mitigate this effect, allowing myeloma patients to successfully complete their treatment and relieving the pain of myeloma survivors. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral
cancer

New Study Shows Repurposing Leukemia Drugs May Prevent Melanoma Metastasis

Data from a new study led by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers shows that repurposing drugs used to treat leukemia has promise for preventing melanoma metastasis. Published in Science Signaling, the study showed new evidence linking the activation of ABL kinases – cancer-promoting genes – to the secretion of pro-metastatic cathepsins in melanoma. Cathepsins are enzymes that degrade proteins and are highly expressed in cancer cells, resulting in their release
Biotechnology

Beta Blockers May Boost Immunotherapy, Help Melanoma Patients Live Longer

A common, inexpensive drug that is used to prevent heart attacks and lower blood pressure may also help melanoma patients live longer. Researchers at Penn State found that melanoma patients who received immunotherapy while taking a specific type of beta blocker lived longer than patients who received immunotherapy alone. In a follow-up experiment with mice, the researchers saw the same results. Todd Schell, professor of microbiology and immunology at Penn State
cancer Cancer Discovery

Researchers Detect a Loophole in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment

A team of researchers in Italy and Austria has determined that a drug approved to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) may be less effective in a particular subset of patients. The study, which will be published January 4 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that ibrutinib has a diminished capacity to delocalize and kill tumor cells expressing an adhesive protein called CD49d, but combining ibrutinib treatment with drugs that block
cancer

Some Cancer Therapies May Provide a New Way to Treat High Blood Pressure

Drugs designed to halt cancer growth may offer a new way to control high blood pressure (hypertension), say Georgetown University Medical Center investigators. The finding could offer a real advance in hypertension treatment because although a number of high blood pressure drugs are now available, they work by different mechanisms that are not suited for all patients. The study, published in the journal Hypertension, found that fibroblast growth factors, or FGFs,
stem cells

Prostaglandin E1 Inhibits Leukemia Stem Cells Targeting leukemia stem cells in combination with standard chemotherapy may improve treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia

Two drugs, already approved for safe use in people, may be able to improve therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a blood cancer that affects myeloid cells, according to results from a University of Iowa study in mice. CML is a relatively common cancer. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2017 there will be about 8,950 new cases and about 1,080 people will die of the disease. In its
Pharmaceutical Business News

Sangamo Therapeutics and Pfizer Announce Collaboration for Hemophilia A Gene Therapy

Sangamo Therapeutics, Inc. and Pfizer Inc. announced this week, an exclusive, global collaboration and license agreement for the development and commercialization of gene therapy programs for Hemophilia A, including SB-525, one of Sangamo's four lead product candidates, which Sangamo expects will enter the clinic this quarter. "Sangamo brings deep scientific and technical expertise across multiple genomic platforms, and we look forward to working together to advance this potentially transformative treatment
Diabetes

Liver Disease Risk Increased by Type 2 Diabetes, Study Finds

People with type 2 diabetes are at greater risk of serious liver disease than those without the condition, research has shown. Researchers warn that hospital admissions and deaths caused by liver disease are likely to rise if cases of type 2 diabetes continue to increase at current rates. The team examined cases of liver diseases among people with diabetes from anonymised, securely linked hospital records and death records in Scotland