Alzheimers and Dementia Neurology Neuroscience

Decreased deep sleep linked to early signs of Alzheimer’s disease

 Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may have uncovered part of the explanation. They found that older people who have less slow-wave sleep – the deep sleep you need to consolidate memories and wake up feeling refreshed – have higher levels of the brain protein tau. Elevated tau is a sign of Alzheimer’s disease and has been linked to brain damage and cognitive decline. The
Alzheimers and Dementia

New Generation of Therapeutics Based on Understanding of Aging Biology Show Promise for Alzheimer’s Disease

 A scientific strategy that explores therapeutic targets based on the biology of aging is gaining ground as an effective approach to prevent and treat Alzheimer's disease, accordingdd to research published in the December 7, 2018 online issue of Neurology®. A comprehensive review of the clinical trial landscape, including current agents being studied for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease (and other dementias), points to the need to develop and test
Alzheimers and Dementia

Johns Hopkins Team Identifies Promising Diagnostic Tool For Alzheimer’s Disease

 Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have identified in live human brains new radioactive “tracer” molecules that bind to and “light up” tau tangles, a protein associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and other related dementias. Two studies will be published back-to-back in the December issue of Journal of Nuclear Medicine—one as featured article of the month—describing testing of three candidate molecules in patients with Alzheimer’s disease, as
Alzheimers and Dementia

DNA Vaccine Reduces Both Toxic Proteins Linked to Alzheimer’s

A DNA vaccine tested in mice reduces accumulation of both types of toxic proteins associated with Alzheimer’s disease, according to research that scientists say may pave the way to a clinical trial. A new study by UT Southwestern’s Peter O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute shows that a vaccine delivered to the skin prompts an immune response that reduces buildup of harmful tau and beta-amyloid – without triggering severe brain swelling that earlier antibody
Alzheimers and Dementia

Meditation and music may improve memory of those at-risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

September is World Alzheimer’s Month, and subjective cognitive decline, or SCD, can be a warning sign for the disease. Symptoms can include losing one’s train of thought, forgetting the content of a movie soon after the credits roll and feeling overwhelmed when making plans or coordinating events. Kim Innes, an epidemiology professor from the West Virginia University School of Public Health, and her team are studying the potential benefits of a simple meditation or
Biotechnology

Robot Helps with Early Screening for Alzheimer’s Patients

September is World Alzheimer’s Awareness Month and a new project in collaboration with UP Health System Portage investigates how technology can assist doctors in earlier diagnosis of the neurodegenerative disease. Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports as many as five million Americans had the disease in 2013. They estimate that by 2050, nearly 14 million will have it. Age
age-related decline Alzheimers and Dementia

Scientists Propose a New Lead for Alzheimer’s Research

A University of Adelaide-led team of scientists has suggested a potential link between iron in our cells and the rare gene mutations that cause Alzheimer’s disease, which could provide new avenues for future research. In a paper published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience, the team proposes a new theory for how rare gene mutations cause Alzheimer’s disease. A theory that, if proven, could assist in finding a way to prevent the
Alzheimers and Dementia

DBS Treatment May Slow the Progression of Parkinson’s Tremor in Early-Stage Patients

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) may slow the progression of tremor for early-stage Parkinson’s disease patients, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study released in the June 29 online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study is the first evidence of a treatment that slows the progression of one of the cardinal features of Parkinson’s, but a larger-scale clinical trial across multiple investigational centers
Alzheimers and Dementia

Study Predicts Most People with Earliest Alzheimer’s Signs Won’t Develop Dementia Associated with the Disease

 During the past decade, researchers have identified new ways to detect the earliest biological signs of Alzheimer’s disease. These early signs, which are detected by biomarkers, may be present before a person starts to exhibit physical symptoms. What biomarker screening doesn’t reveal, however, is how likely it is that a person who tests positive will eventually develop the dementia associated with Alzheimer’s disease. That’s where the new predictions from researchers
Alzheimers and Dementia

Researchers Identify Gene That Helps Prevent Brain Disease

Scientists know that faulty proteins can cause harmful deposits or “aggregates” in neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Although the causes of these protein deposits remain a mystery, it is known that abnormal aggregates can result when cells fail to transmit proper genetic information to proteins. University of California San Diego Professor Susan Ackerman and her colleagues first highlighted this cause of brain disease more than 10 years
Neurodegenerative diseases Neurology

Preliminary Study Suggests Drug May Help Babies with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

A preliminary study suggests that an investigational drug may help increase protein levels in babies with spinal muscular atrophy. The open-label study is released today and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 70th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, April 21 to 27, 2018. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited disease that leads to loss of motor function. It is the leading genetic cause of death in
Neurodegenerative diseases Neurology Parkinson's

A Single Concussion May Increase Risk of Parkinson’s Disease

People who have been diagnosed with a mild concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury, may have a 56 percent increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, according to a study published in the April 18, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. “Previous research has shown a strong link between moderate to severe traumatic brain injury and an increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease
Alzheimers and Dementia

Researchers Successfully Reverse Alzheimer’s Disease in Mouse Model

A team of researchers from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute have found that gradually depleting an enzyme called BACE1 completely reverses the formation of amyloid plaques in the brains of mice with Alzheimer’s disease, thereby improving the animals’ cognitive function. The study, which will be published February 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, raises hopes that drugs targeting this enzyme will be able to successfully treat Alzheimer’s disease in
Alzheimers and Dementia Biotechnology

Researchers Find a Potential Target for Anti-Alzheimer’s Treatments

Scientists at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg have identified a gene that may provide a new starting point for developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The USP9 gene has an indirect influence on the so-called tau protein, which is believed to play a significant role in the onset of Alzheimer's disease. This discovery by the LCSB researchers, led by Dr. Enrico Glaab, may
Alzheimers and Dementia Antibiotics

Antibiotics Weaken Alzheimer’s Disease Progression Through Changes in the Gut Microbiome

Long-term treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics decreased levels of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, and activated inflammatory microglial cells in the brains of mice in a new study by neuroscientists from the University of Chicago. The study, published July 21, 2016, in Scientific Reports, also showed significant changes in the gut microbiome after antibiotic treatment, suggesting the composition and diversity of bacteria in the gut play an important
Alzheimers and Dementia

Estrogen Patch in Newly Postmenopausal Women May Reduce Alzheimer’s Risk

Can estrogen preserve brain function and decrease the risk of Alzheimer’s disease when given early in menopause? Newly postmenopausal women who received estrogen via a skin patch had reduced beta-amyloid deposits, the sticky plaques found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease, a Mayo Clinic study published this month in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease found. Ultimately, these deposits harm neurons, leading to cognitive problems. In the study, women
Alzheimers and Dementia

Understanding How Chemical Changes in the Brain Affect Alzheimer’s Disease

A new study from Western University is helping to explain why the long-term use of common anticholinergic drugs used to treat conditions like allergies and overactive bladder lead to an increased risk of developing dementia later in life. The findings show that long-term suppression of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine - a target for anticholinergic drugs - results in dementia-like changes in the brain. "There have been several epidemiological studies showing that
Alzheimers and Dementia Gene Therapy Genomes

Case Western Reserve University Receives NIH Funding to Participate in Launch of Genomics Center on Alzheimer’s Disease

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine is one of six recipients of a five-year, $10.8 million award from the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health, to establish the Coordinating Center for Genetics and Genomics of Alzheimer’s disease. The hope is that discovering genetic risk and prevention factors will enable and accelerate development of prevention and treatments. The project is a joint venture of researchers
Alzheimers and Dementia

The Lauder and Newhouse Families Announce New Initiative to Find Treatments for Frontotemporal Degeneration

As of 2016, we still don’t have a single approved drug to cure or even slow the progression of diseases caused by damage to the brain’s neurons. The Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) and The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD) are determined to change that. Today, they announce a $10 million investment to develop effective treatments for frontotemporal degeneration (FTD), a complex form of dementia that affects more than 50,000
Gene Therapy Genomes

Genetic Variations that Boost PKC Enzyme Contribute to Alzheimer’s Disease

In Alzheimer’s disease, plaques of amyloid beta protein accumulate in the brain, damaging connections between neurons. Now, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School have found that the enzyme Protein Kinase C (PKC) alpha is necessary for amyloid beta to damage neuronal connections. They also identified genetic variations that enhance PKC alpha activity in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. The study, published May 10