Infectious Diseases

Out-Of-Pocket Costs Put HIV Prevention Drug Out Of Reach For Many At Risk

Public health officials are expanding efforts to get the HIV prevention pill into the hands of those at risk, in a nationwide effort to curb infections. But the officials are hitting roadblocks — the drug’s price tag, which has surged in recent years, and changes in insurance coverage that put a heftier financial burden on patients. Since brand-name Truvada was approved for HIV prevention six years ago, its average wholesale
Infectious Diseases

‘Molecular Scissors’ Could Be Key to Cutting Off Diseases Including HIV Infection

One way to fight diseases including HIV infection and autoimmune disorders could involve changing how a naturally occurring enzyme called SAMHD1 works to influence the immune system, new research suggests. The study, led by researchers from The Ohio State University, details how the enzyme influences proteins that stimulate the immune response. SAMHD1 isn’t a molecular “good guy” or “bad guy” per se, but there are cases in which blocking its
Cardiology

Individuals with HIV at Higher Risk for Heart Disease

A review of more than 80 studies reveals that changes in the immune cells of people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection may increase their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The review is published in the journal Physiology. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) consists of a “cocktail” of several drugs that work together to reduce the amount of detectable virus (viral load) in the bloodstream. Since the development of this combination treatment approach more
Biotechnology rare diseases

UAB Celebrates World AIDS Day 2016 and 30 Years of Research in the Clinical Trials Network

The AIDS Clinical Trials Group Network and the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s 1917 Clinic celebrate 30 years of AIDS research Dec. 2, just one day after World AIDS Day 2016. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 1.2 million people are living with HIV/AIDS in the United States; globally, the number is a staggering 35 million. UAB’s 1917 Clinic is a member of the largest
Hepatitis Vaccines

Largest HIV Transmission Study Conducted

A new study has found that neither gay men nor heterosexual people with HIV transmit the virus to their partner, provided they are on suppressive antiretroviral treatment. The PARTNER study, which is the world's largest study of people with HIV who have had condomless sex with their HIV negative partners, was conducted by investigators from the University of Liverpool, University College London, Royal Free NHS and Rigshospitalet (one of the
cancer Cancer Discovery Cell Therapy Vaccines

UMN researchers find distinct differences in structure, features of retroviruses

In the most comprehensive study of its kind, researchers in the Institute for Molecular Virology and School of Dentistry at the University of Minnesota report that most types of retroviruses have distinct, non-identical virus structures. Researchers analyzed seven different retroviruses including two types of HIV as well as HTLV-1, a virus that causes T-cell leukemia. They also examined retroviruses that infect birds, mice, chimpanzees and fish, that can cause cancer
Pharmaceuticals Prescriptions

A New Way to Nip AIDS in the Bud

When new AIDS virus particles bud from an infected cell, an enzyme named protease activates to help the viruses mature and infect more cells. That’s why modern AIDS drugs control the disease by inhibiting protease. Now, University of Utah researchers found a way to turn protease into a double-edged sword: They showed that if they delay the budding of new HIV particles, protease itself will destroy the virus instead of
Biotechnology

New Method Developed to Preserve Microfluidic Devices for HIV Monitoring in Developing Countries

Providing vital health care services to people in developing countries without reliable electricity, refrigeration and state-of-the-art medical equipment poses a number of challenges. Inspired by pregnancy tests, researchers from Florida Atlantic University, Stanford University, and Baskent University in Turkey, have developed a novel method to store microfluidic devices for CD4 T cell testing in extreme weather conditions for up to six months without refrigeration. Microfluidic devices with immunochemistry have broad