Biotechnology Cell Therapy Clinical Trials Immunotherapies stem cells

Dana-Farber researchers report clinical trial results in treatment of leukemia and lymphoma

New results from clinical trials of immunotherapy and experimental targeted agents for patients with leukemia and lymphoma are being presented by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting Dec. 1-4.  Here are summaries of three presentations, including one that compared outcomes of CAR T-cell therapy in patients in clinical trials with outcomes in the “real world” of clinical practice: CAR T-cell treatment provides durable
cancer Cancer Discovery

New CAR T Case Study Shows Promise in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-cell therapy, also known as CAR T therapy, was named the biggest research breakthrough of 2017 by the American Society of Clinical Oncology. The personal gene therapy utilizes a patient’s own immune cells to fight cancer. The Food and Drug Administration has approved CAR T therapy products for adults with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and pediatric and young adults suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Now, researchers at
Biotechnology

Mayo Clinic Researchers Find Association Between Therapy for Autoimmune Disease and Bone Marrow Disorders

Mayo Clinic researchers have found that azathioprine, a drug commonly used to treat autoimmune disease, may increase the risk of myeloid neoplasms. Myeloid neoplasms include a spectrum of potentially life-threatening bone marrow disorders, such as myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia. The results are published in JAMA Oncology. Researchers analyzed more than 40,000 patient cases with 27 common autoimmune diseases, such as Lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, among others, that were seen
Biotechnology cancer

In Highly Lethal Type Of Leukemia, Cancer Gene Predicts Treatment Response

Patients whose cancer cells carry TP53 mutations respond to milder chemotherapy Patients with the most lethal form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) – based on genetic profiles of their cancers – typically survive for only four to six months after diagnosis, even with aggressive chemotherapy. But new research indicates that such patients, paradoxically, may live longer if they receive a milder chemotherapy drug. Treatment with the less intensive drug, decitabine,
cancer Cell Therapy

Antibody Breaks Leukemia’s Hold, Providing New Therapeutic Approach

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer known for drug resistance and relapse. In an effort to uncover new treatment strategies, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center discovered that a cell surface molecule known as CD98 promotes AML. The study, published October 27 by Cancer Cell, also shows that inhibiting CD98 with the therapeutic antibody IGN523 blocks AML growth in patient-derived
Biotechnology cancer Clinical Trials Radiopharmaceuticals

FDA Greenlights Orphan Drug Status for Radioimmuneconjugate for Treating Refractory and Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Elderly Patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted orphan drug designation for Iomab-B, a radioimmunotherapeutic that conditions relapsed and refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) patients for a Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT), commonly referred to as a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT). Iomab-B will soon begin a 150 patient, pivotal Phase 3 multicenter trial in relapsed and refractory AML patients over the age of 55. Iomab-B is a radioimmunoconjugate consisting