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Liver Cancer Drug Shows Promise in Preventing Liver Fibrosis and Treating NASH

Namodenoson, a Phase II drug developed by Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd. (NYSE MKT: CANF), has shown in newly published data that it prevents liver (hepatic) fibrosis progression in preclinical studies.

“These latest study results add to the growing body of data that demonstrate Namodenoson’s potential efficacy in combating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the precursor to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), indications for which there is currently no FDA approved drug. We are advancing Namodenoson into a Phase II trial in NAFLD and expect to commence patient enrollment in the coming months through leading medical institutions in Israel,” stated Can-Fite CEO Dr. Pnina Fishman.

NAFLD is characterized by excess fat accumulation in the form of triglycerides (steatosis) in the liver. According to a recent study published in Hepatology, an estimated 25% of the population in the U.S. has NAFLD, with a higher prevalence in people with type II diabetes. Incidence is increasing based on rising obesity rates. NAFLD includes a range of liver diseases, with NASH being the more advanced form, manifesting as hepatic injury and inflammation. According to the NIH, the incidence of NASH in the U.S. is believed to affect 2-5% of the population. The spectrum of NAFLDs resembles alcoholic liver disease; however, they occur in people who drink little or no alcohol. If untreated, NASH can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer.

By 2025, the addressable pharmaceutical market for NASH is estimated to reach $35-40 billion.

Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of scar tissue resulting from ongoing inflammation. It can result in diminished blood flow throughout the liver and is associated with NAFLD.

Recent preclinical studies in a mouse model of liver fibrosis demonstrated the anti-fibrotic effects of Namodenoson. The Namodenoson treated group exhibited normal liver under macroscopic view, no accumulation of fluid (ascites), a low fibrosis profile, and lower serum levels of transaminases as compared to the control group. In addition, liver protein extracts and mRNA for the alpha smooth muscle actin showed a significant anti-fibrotic effect in the Namodenoson treated group as compared to the control group.

These studies were conducted under the supervision of Prof. Rifaat Safadi M.D., a Key Opinion Leader in the field of liver diseases, and Director of Liver Unit, Institute of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Hadassah University Hospital, Ein Kerem.

Prof. Safadi commented, “Lowering liver fat content and fibrosis are the main unmet needs in NASH. Today there is a huge market need for drugs that fight the worldwide NASH epidemic.”

“Namodenoson is uniquely compelling for its potential to treat NAFLD and NASH because its safety profile has already been de-risked, increasing the likelihood it can advance through late stage trials and into clinical use for this large and unmet need,” Dr. Safadi added. “In general, there is significant development risk for new potential drugs in development due to safety risks including drug induced liver injury (DILI), drug-to-drug interactions (DDI), and metabolites in safety testing (MIST). Namodenoson, however, has demonstrated a good safety profile and is low or negative for DILI, DDI and MIST.”

“In addition, Namodenoson recognizes the difference between diseased and normal cells, and targets only the diseased cells through the specific A3 adenosine receptor. This precision targeting is designed to lead to higher efficacy and safety by leaving healthy cells unaffected. We are all looking for drugs with this profile to treat NASH,” concluded Dr. Safari.

Can-Fite plans to commence patient recruitment for its Phase II trial of Namodenoson in NASH/NAFLD in the second quarter of 2017.