Antibiotics Biotechnology Pharmaceuticals Prescriptions

Link Found Between Pediatric Osteoporosis and Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

By studying mice in late adolescence, Johns Hopkins University researchers have discovered that the rapid bone growth associated with puberty is slowed not only by fewer cartilage cell divisions but also by the “aging” of bone cell precursor cells. After investigating the signaling molecules that promote this transition, the scientists conclude that some weak and brittle bone conditions in both children and adults may be due to the cells’ premature
Biotechnology Clinical Trials Pharmaceuticals Prescriptions Prodrug

IU Research Suggests Failed Osteoarthritis Drug Could Get New Life as Opioid-Addiction Treatment

A new study from Indiana University suggests that a drug proven safe for use in people may prevent opioid tolerance and physical dependence when used in combination with opioid-based pain medications. Researchers in the Linda and Jack Gill Center for Biomolecular Science at IU Bloomington have discovered that a compound previously tested to treat osteoarthritis pain appears to block neuropathic pain and decrease signs of opioid dependence. The work is reported in the
Biotechnology cancer Clinical Trials Prescriptions

Tumor-Targeting Drug Shows Potential for Treating Bone Cancer Patients

Preclinical study shows BMTP-11 targets high-risk osteosarcoma The treatment of osteosarcoma, the most common tumor of bone, is challenging. A study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found a drug known as bone metastasis-targeting peptidomimetic (BMTP-11) has potential as a new therapeutic strategy for this devastating illness. Results from the preclinical study, which looked at BMTP-11 alone and in combination with the chemotherapy agent gemcitabine, were
Alzheimers and Dementia Biotechnology Prescriptions

Eli Lilly, Biogen, and Neurotrope Fight to Find Viable Treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease

Repeated attempts to treat or even slow the relentless progression of Alzheimer's disease by targeting just one red flag in patient's brains have continued to lead to disappointing outcomes. Last Sunday "Sixty Minutes" episode aired on Columbian extended families that inherited a genetic defect that causes early onset Alzheimer's, by the time they reach 45 years old. Watching the episode brings to light another case in which a young lady
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Large Integrated Health Outcomes Study Reveals Shifting Epidemiology In Drug-Resistant Organisms

A first-of-its-kind study of 900,000 hospital admissions from an integrated health system has yielded insights into shifts in the epidemiology of multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs) in the community. New research, funded by OpGen (NASDAQ: OPGN) and conducted by Intermountain Healthcare and Enterprise Analysis Corporation (EAC), found that Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) and ESBL harboring Gram-negative rods were the most common organisms treated by the Intermountain Healthcare
Cardiology Pharmaceuticals Prescriptions

Calcium Supplements May Damage The Heart

After analyzing 10 years of medical tests on more than 2,700 people in a federally funded heart disease study, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and elsewhere conclude that taking calcium in the form of supplements may raise the risk of plaque buildup in arteries and heart damage, although a diet high in calcium-rich foods appears be protective. In a report on the research, published Oct. 10 in the Journal of
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Researchers Find Fungus-Fighting Compound in Drug Discovery Center Library

Researchers with the Virginia Tech Center for Drug Discovery have identified a compound that blocks the growth of a fungus that causes deadly lung infections and allergic reactions in people with compromised immune systems. The research team targeted the switch that allows the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus to survive in iron-deficient conditions like the human body. Specifically, they targeted an enzyme known as SidA, which is essential for the synthesis of
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A New Way to Nip AIDS in the Bud

When new AIDS virus particles bud from an infected cell, an enzyme named protease activates to help the viruses mature and infect more cells. That’s why modern AIDS drugs control the disease by inhibiting protease. Now, University of Utah researchers found a way to turn protease into a double-edged sword: They showed that if they delay the budding of new HIV particles, protease itself will destroy the virus instead of
cancer Cell Therapy Pharmaceuticals Prescriptions

Antibody-Based Drug Helps “Bridge” Leukemia Patients to Curative Treatment

In a randomized Phase III study of the drug inotuzumab ozogamicin, a statistically significant percentage of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) whose disease had relapsed following standard therapies, qualified for stem cell transplants. Inotuzumab ozogamicin, also known as CMC-544, links an antibody that targets CD22, a protein found on the surface of more than 90 percent of ALL cells. Once the drug connects to CD22, the ALL cell draws
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Hunting for the brain’s opioid addiction switch

New research by Steven Laviolette's research team at Western University is contributing to a better understanding of the ways opiate-class drugs modify brain circuits to drive the addiction cycle. Using rodent models of opiate addiction, Dr. Laviolette's research has shown that opiates affect pathways of associative memory formation in multiple ways, both at the level of anatomy (connections between neurons) and at the molecular levels (how molecules inside the brain
Arthritis Biotechnology Clinical Trials Pharmaceuticals Prescriptions

New Study Shows Common NSAIDs can cause more Harm than Good

Many patients around the world, are prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (called NSAIDs) for the treatment of painful conditions, fever and inflammation. But the treatment also comes with side effects, including the risk of ulcers and increased blood pressure. A major new study from Denmark complied new research that demonstrated that a common arthritis medicine is particularly dangerous for heart patients. The study also uncovered that older types of arthritis medicine,