Biotechnology cancer Cancer Discovery Cell Therapy drug development

Anti-Malaria Drugs Have Shown Promise in Treating Cancer, and Now Researchers Know Why

Anti-malaria drugs known as chloroquines have been repurposed to treat cancer for decades, but until now no one knew exactly what the chloroquines were targeting when they attack a tumor. Now, researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania say they have identified that target – an enzyme called PPT1 – opening up a new pathway for potential cancer treatments. The team also used CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing
cancer Clinical Trials drug development Surgery

Neoadjuvant Combination Checkpoint Blockade Trial Yields High Response Rates for Patients with High-Risk Stage 3 Melanoma

Combination checkpoint blockade before surgery (neoadjuvant therapy) produced a high response rate among patients with high-risk stage 3 melanoma, with nearly half having no sign of disease at surgery, but a high incidence of side effects caused the trial to be closed early. The phase II study was led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Results of the study, the first randomized neoadjuvant clinical trial
Antibiotics Clinical Trials drug development rare diseases

Taking a Pill Can Effectively Treat Brutal Lung Disease

Researchers report in Nature Communications they figured out why air sacs in the lungs clog up with a thick substance called surfactant in a brutal disease called Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP), and they show taking cholesterol-busting pills called statins can effectively treat the disease. That’s good news for people with PAP because at present the current standard treatment is something called a whole lung lavage. Essentially, it involves flushing patient