Diabetes

Improved Options for Diabetics: Insurance Coverage Now Available for Dario’s New Glucose Monitoring Device and App

More than 387 million people are living with diabetes worldwide. This number is expected to grow to 592 million by 2035. Effective daily blood glucose monitoring is a huge factor in the health and wellbeing of diabetics. A new mobile health app and all-in-one blood glucose monitor system from DarioHealth Corp. (DRIO) can improve monitoring and outcomes for diabetics. The Dario™ Smart Diabetes Management Solution is a platform for diabetes
cancer Diabetes

Liver Cancer Drug Shows Promise in Preventing Liver Fibrosis and Treating NASH

Namodenoson, a Phase II drug developed by Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd. (NYSE MKT: CANF), has shown in newly published data that it prevents liver (hepatic) fibrosis progression in preclinical studies. "These latest study results add to the growing body of data that demonstrate Namodenoson's potential efficacy in combating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the precursor to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), indications for which there is currently no FDA approved drug. We are
Diabetes

Study Suggests New Way to Prevent Vision Loss in Diabetics and Premature Babies

Researchers at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, part of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, have identified a new molecule that induces the formation of abnormal blood vessels in the eyes of diabetic mice. The study, “Secretogranin III as a disease-associated ligand for antiangiogenic therapy of diabetic retinopathy,” which will be published March 22 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that inhibiting this molecule may prevent similarly aberrant
Diabetes

Scientists Find Therapeutic Target for Diabetes-Related Blindness

Study reveals single cell type and surface molecule sufficient to cause common complication Specific cells in the retina trigger inflammation and vision impairment associated with diabetes, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The findings unexpectedly implicate Müller cells—which provide structural support in the retina—as key drivers of the process. Researchers now have a therapeutic target in hand and understand initial steps of diabetic
Biotechnology Diabetes

A Pure Regenerative Medicine Play

by Richard (Rick) Mills, editor of aheadoftheherd.com As a general rule, the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information The promise of regenerative medicine is to treat disease and injury by replacing, regenerating or rejuvenating various parts of the human body that have been damaged by chronic disease, traumatic injury, heart attack, stroke, or aging. Treatments include both in vivo (studies and trials performed
Biotechnology Diabetes Gene Therapy

Researching Proinsulin Misfolding to Understand Diabetes

  According to the World Health Organization, 422 million adults across the globe have diabetes. In fact, the number of adults with the disease continues to grow each year. To help the growing patient population, researchers at the University of Michigan are going down to the molecular level. Here, they’re trying to determine what makes cells in the diabetic pancreas less efficient in generating insulin molecules. Diabetes occurs when the
Diabetes rare diseases

New Data From Harvard & Yale Researchers Reveal Breakthrough Oral Fully Human Anti-CD3 Antibody, for the Treatment of NASH, Diabetes & Autoimmune Diseases

Immunotherapies have shown great promise to treat a wide range of diseases including auto-immune disease and NASH. However, they are typically administered through IV instead of orally because if taken orally, they would be degraded and inactivated by the harsh conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. New data from preclinical studies conducted by Prof. Kevan Herold of Yale University and Prof. Howard Weiner of Harvard University show that Foralumab, a drug
Diabetes Ophthalmology

Microbes In Your Gut Influence Major Eye Disease

Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the industrialized world, affecting over 10 million individuals in North America. A study lead by Dr. Przemyslaw (Mike) Sapieha, researcher at Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont (CIUSSS de l’Est-de-l’Île-de-Montréal) and professor at the University of Montreal, published in EMBO Molecular Medicine, uncovered that bacteria in your intestines may play an important role in determining if you will develop blinding wet AMD.
Diabetes Hepatitis

Fatty Liver: Turning Off TAZ Reverses Disease

Scientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have identified a factor in liver cells that is responsible for turning a relatively benign liver condition, present in 30 percent of U.S. adults, into a serious disease that can lead to liver failure. The study was published online today in Cell Metabolism. With the rise of obesity in the U.S., the incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)—in which excess fat fills
Diabetes

Stealth Pig Cells May Hold The Key To Treating Diabetes In Humans

University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers are exploring ways to wrap pig tissue with a protective coating to ultimately fight diabetes in humans. The nano-thin bilayers of protective material are meant to deter or prevent immune rejection. The ultimate goal: transplant insulin-producing cell-clusters from pigs into humans to treat Type 1 diabetes. In preclinical work begun this year, these stealth insulin-producers — pancreatic islets from pigs or mice coated with
Diabetes Neurology

Six Teams Seek To Identify Biological Factors That Influence Neural Regeneration

The National Institutes of Health will fund six projects to identify biological factors that affect neural regeneration in the retina. The projects are part of the National Eye Institute (NEI) Audacious Goals Initiative (AGI), a targeted effort to restore vision by regenerating neurons and their connections in the eye and visual system. These projects will receive a total of $12.4 million over three years, pending availability of funds. “Understanding factors
Diabetes

Researchers: Insulin Pill Could Make Diabetes Treatment ‘Ouchless’

Every day, millions of Americans with diabetes have to inject themselves with insulin to manage their blood-sugar levels. But less painful alternatives are emerging. Scientists are developing a new way of administering the medicine orally with tiny vesicles that can deliver insulin where it needs to go without a shot. Today, they share their in vivo testing results. The researchers are presenting their work at the 252nd National Meeting &
Diabetes

Regenerative bandage heals diabetic wounds faster

At some point in their lives, 15 percent of people with diabetes will develop a painful and hard-to-treat foot ulcer. Twenty-four percent of those affected will require a lower-leg amputation because of it. And, in some instances, what seems like a harmless sore might even lead to death. A Northwestern University team has developed a new treatment for this severe and potentially deadly complication of diabetes. Called a "regenerative bandage,"
Diabetes

Genetics Of Type 2 Diabetes Revealed In Unprecedented Detail

The largest study of its kind into type 2 diabetes has produced the most detailed picture to date of the genetics underlying the condition. More than 300 scientists from 22 countries collaborated on the study, which analysed the genomes of more than 120,000 people with ancestral origins in Europe, South and East Asia, the Americas and Africa. The findings, published today in Nature, identify several potential targets for new diabetes
Diabetes

Study: Chronic Kidney Disease May Cause Diabetes

A team from the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) has discovered a novel link between chronic kidney disease and diabetes. When kidneys fail, urea that builds up in the blood can cause diabetes, concludes a study published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. "We identified molecular mechanisms that may be responsible for increased blood glucose levels in patients with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease. Our observations in mice
Biotechnology Diabetes

Sernova Tackles both Diabetes and Hemophilia with one Technology

contributed by Richard (Rick) Mills Editor, Ahead of the Herd As a general rule, the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information. Paul Lacey was a researcher at Washington University when, in 1972, he cured some diabetic rats by transplanting the islet cells from healthy rats into diabetic ones. Over the next two decades researchers made many attempts to apply the procedure to humans.
Diabetes

Joint Research Collaboration Aims to Advance Human Clinical Trials for the Treatment of Hypoglycemic Unawareness Patients with Severe Type 1 Diabetes

A new research funding agreement between the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) and Sernova, a clinical-stage regenerative medicine biotech, aims to address people with severe type 1 diabetes (T1D) who are hypoglycemia unaware, a condition in which a person with diabetes does not experience the usual early warning symptoms of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) following an insulin injection. The purpose of the funding is to advance human clinical trials of
Diabetes

Liver Disease Risk Increased by Type 2 Diabetes, Study Finds

People with type 2 diabetes are at greater risk of serious liver disease than those without the condition, research has shown. Researchers warn that hospital admissions and deaths caused by liver disease are likely to rise if cases of type 2 diabetes continue to increase at current rates. The team examined cases of liver diseases among people with diabetes from anonymised, securely linked hospital records and death records in Scotland
Biotechnology Diabetes

Scientists Reveal New Target for Anti-Lymphangiogenesis Drugs

After an injury to tissues, such as in organ transplantation, the body grows new lymphatic vessels in a process known as lymphangiogenesis.  A new study in Nature Communications reveals a mechanism involved in the regulation of this process, specifically in corneal transplants and infectious eye disease. The team, led by researchers from Tufts University School of Medicine, the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts, and Tufts Medical Center,