cancer Cancer Discovery

Prevention of Genetic Breast Cancer Within Reach

An international team led by researchers at the Austrian Institute of Molecular Biotechnology (IMBA) in Vienna and the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore discovered that genetically determined breast cancer can be largely prevented by blocking a bone gene. An already approved drug could be quickly available and would then be the first breast cancer prevention drug. About one in eight women will develop invasive breast cancer over
cancer

Breaking Down Cancer Cell Defenses

The mistaken activation of certain cell-surface receptors contributes to a variety of human cancers. Knowing more about the activation process has led researchers to be able to induce greater vulnerability by cancer cells to an existing first-line treatment for cancers (mainly lung) driven by a receptor called EGFR. The team, led by Eric Witze, PhD, an assistant professor of Cancer Biology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University
cancer Clinical Trials

Despite Pressing Need, Survey Finds Most Americans Unlikely to Enroll in Clinical Trials

The lack of participation in clinical research may be the Achilles’ heel of today’s cancer community. According to a new survey of more than 1,500 consumers and nearly 600 physicians conducted on behalf of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK), only 35 percent of Americans indicated that they were “likely” to enroll in a clinical trial. Other studies have shown that only 4 percent of cancer patients enroll in clinical
Biotechnology cancer

Breast cancer drug found to reduce seizures

A class of drug that inhibits estrogen production and is used to treat breast cancer has been found to quickly and effectively suppress dangerous brain seizures, according to a new Northwestern University study. "The effect was profound and very clear," said Catherine S. Woolley, senior author of the study, which was conducted in a rat model of status epilepticus, a condition characterized by a prolonged episode of seizure activity. "This
cancer Cancer Discovery Diagnostic Testing

No symptoms, but could there be cancer? Our chemosensor will detect it!

Many cancers could be successfully treated if the patient consulted the doctor sufficiently early. But how can a developing cancer be detected if it doesn't give rise to any symptoms? In the near future, suitably early diagnosis could be provided by simple and cheap chemical sensors - thanks to special recognizing polymer films developed at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. These days,
cancer Cancer Discovery

UK Study Shows New Potential Marker for Obesity

A new study led by University of Kentucky researchers and published in Nature shows a potential new biological marker for the development of obesity and a possible target for obesity prevention and treatment. Neurotensin (NT), a peptide produced mainly in the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, is released with fat ingestion and facilitates fatty acid absorption in the intestine. Previous research has shown that NT can also stimulate the
cancer

Prolonged Breath Holds of Over Five Minutes Could Help in Targeted Radiotherapy

Researchers at the University of Birmingham working with clinical teams at University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust have successfully shown for the first time that breast cancer patients can be trained to achieve single prolonged breath holds of over five minutes, opening the door for targeted radiotherapy to be administered with just one dose in each daily session. A typical radiotherapy beam in each daily session takes two minutes to
cancer Cancer Discovery

Stopping Cancer in Its Tracks

Researchers from the University of Chicago have shown that inhibiting autophagy, a self-devouring process used by cells to degrade large intra-cellular cargo, effectively blocks tumor cell migration and breast cancer metastasis in tumor models. In a study, published May 12, 2016, in the journal Cell Reports, they demonstrate that the process is essential for tumor metastasis and describe the mechanisms that connect autophagy to cell migration. “Using genetic and chemical
cancer Gene Therapy Genomes

Discovery of Cancer Gene May Predict Survival and Guide Treatment in Patients with Mouth Cancers

Loyola researchers have identified a tumor gene that may help to predict survival outcomes in patients with cancer of the mouth and tongue. If the gene is expressed (turned on), patients are 4.6 times more likely to die at any given time, according to a study by researchers at Loyola Medicine and Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. The finding, published in the journal Otolaryngology – Head and Neck
cancer

Targeted Missiles Against Aggressive Cancer Cells

Targeted missiles that can enter cancer cells and deliver lethal cell toxins without harming surrounding healthy tissue. This has been a long-standing vision in cancer research, but it has proved difficult to accomplish. A research group at Lund University in Sweden has now taken some crucial steps in this direction. “For several years, we tried to elucidate which target proteins on the cancer cells’ surface can be used to help
cancer

Costs for Orally-Administered Cancer Drugs Skyrocket

New cancer drugs taken in pill form have become dramatically more expensive in their first year on the market compared with drugs launched 15 years ago, a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study has found. The findings call into question the sustainability of a system that sets high prices at market entry in addition to rapidly increasing those prices over time. The researchers report April 28 in JAMA
Biotechnology cancer Cell Therapy

Cell-Penetrating Peptide Delivers Drugs on a Molecular Level

A team of Kennesaw State University faculty and students have developed a novel cell-penetrating peptide technology that could result in new medical treatments ranging from improved cosmetic procedures to helping in the fight against cancer, according to team leader Jonathan McMurry, KSU’s associate vice president for research. McMurry said the researchers’ work, some of which has been published in the March issue of the Journal of Cell Science, has “thousands”
cancer Cancer Discovery

Cell Death – Paradoxically – Promotes Tumor Growth in Most Aggressive Form of Pancreatic Cancer

The most aggressive form of pancreatic cancer – often described as one of the hardest malignancies to diagnose and treat -- thrives in the presence of neighboring tumor cells undergoing a particular form of “orchestrated cell death.” This is according to a major study recently published in the journal Nature. The study results revolve around carefully regulated cell dell death mechanisms that, by killing defective cells or those infected by
cancer Cancer Discovery Cell Therapy

St. Jude Researchers Reveal How Two Types of Immune Cells Can Arise From One

The fates of immune cells can be decided at the initial division of a cell. Researchers at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have discovered that the production of daughter cells with different roles in the immune system is driven by the lopsided distribution of the signaling protein c-Myc. Nudging c-Myc in one direction or the other could make vaccines more effective or advance immunotherapies for cancer treatment. The research appears
Biotechnology cancer Cancer Discovery

First Computer Program Developed to Detect DNA Mutations in Single Cancer Cells

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have announced a new method for detecting DNA mutations in a single cancer cell versus current technology that analyzes millions of cells which they believe could have important applications for cancer diagnosis and treatment. The results are published in the April 18 online issue of Nature Methods. Existing technology, known as next-generation sequencing (NGS), measures genomes derived from millions of
Biotechnology cancer Cancer Discovery

New technology for detecting malignant melanoma skin cancer

Billions are spent on cancer research, some new treatments are available, but why aren’t we making more progress toward a cure? Because cancer is molecular disease – it’s something going wrong with the “molecular machinery” in the cells of our body that normally produce the millions of molecules that keep us alive and healthy. But in cancer cells, this machinery goes awry, creating a growing cell population that keeps multiplying,
cancer Cancer Discovery

Monitoring Sugar Metabolism in Liver May Be a Key to Cancer Diagnosis

Scientists may have discovered a significant new diagnostic marker for liver cancer, according to a paper published in the April 18 online issue of Nature Cell Biology. A study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found that a gene known as KHK (ketohexokinase or fructokinase) is expressed differently in normal liver tissues versus liver tumors. The findings reveal that liver cancer cells had a much reduced
cancer

Inhibition of β2-Adrenergic Receptor Reduces Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Brain Metastases: The Potential Benefit of Perioperative β-Blockade.

While we look to invent new medicines to treat cancer, a parallel approach to repurpose existing medicines may be highly effective. Stress, mediated by adrenaline, has been suspected to promote cancer growth and this research study shows that by blocking adrenaline receptors in breast cancers, they are less successful in spreading to and growing in the brain. Background: Cancer cells are under the relentless drive to spread, this metastasis is
Biotechnology cancer Cancer Discovery

Precision Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

Precision medicine’s public face is that of disease — and better treatments for that disease through targeted therapies. But precision medicine has an unsung partner that could affect the lives of many more people: Precision prevention — a reflection of the growing realization that preventing cancer and other diseases may not be one-size-fits-all. “Precision medicine has been kind of a buzzword recently, but often when people think about precision medicine,
Biomarkers cancer

New Potential Lung Cancer Biomarkers Identified

A team of West Virginia scientists have made a breakthrough in cancer research that could improve the results patients see from lung cancer treatments. Scientists from the West Virginia University Cancer Institute and the Morgantown-based bio-analytic technology company Protea say they've identified changes that occur at the molecular level in lung cancer cells. Those changes may make the cells resistant to cancer-fighting drugs, something researchers say can be a common