Breast Cancer cancer Medical Devices

Acupressure relieves long-term symptoms of breast cancer treatment, study finds

For more information, contact: Nicole Fawcett, nfawcett@umich.edu 734-764-2220 For immediate release Acupressure relieves long-term symptoms of breast cancer treatment, study finds Breast cancer survivors reported improvements in depression, pain, anxiety and sleep after self-administered acupressure Newswise — ANN ARBOR, Michigan —A new study finds acupressure could be a low-cost, at-home solution to a suite of persistent side effects that linger after breast cancer treatment ends. Researchers from the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer
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New Approach May Curb Treatment-Related Skin Fibrosis in Cancer Patients

A clinical-scientific team specializing in head-and-neck cancer has identified a way to manipulate metabolism to potentially curb skin fibrosis -- a common side effect of radiotherapy affecting quality of life of cancer survivors. The study findings from the laboratory of principal investigator Dr. Fei-Fei Liu, Chief, Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, are published online today in Nature Metabolism (DOI:10.1038/s42255-018-0008-5). Dr. Liu is also Professor and Chair,
cancer Cancer Discovery

Liver Transplant Patients Have Higher Prevalence of Colon Cancer and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

 Liver transplant patients over time experience an increasing trend toward colon cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, according to an award-winning study led by a Loyola Medicine gastroenterologist. The study by Ayokunle Abegunde, MD, MSc, and colleagues also found that lung and heart transplant patients have a higher trend toward non-melanoma skin cancer. Dr. Abegunde was the senior author of the study, presented during the American College of Gastroenterology annual conference in Philadelphia.
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Organ-sparing treatments effective for bladder cancer; Brachytherapy cost-effective treatment for prostate cancer

Traditionally, treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer is chemotherapy followed by the removal of the patient’s entire bladder, known as a radical cystectomy. However, Beaumont researchers have data suggesting that treatment consisting of limited surgery followed by combination chemotherapy and radiation is just as effective, while allowing patients to keep their bladder and maintain function. “This is a big deal. No one wants their bladder removed,” said Craig Stevens, M.D., Ph.D., chairman,
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Vaccine, Checkpoint Drugs Combination Shows Promise for Pancreatic Cancers

 Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center discovered a combination of a cancer vaccine with two checkpoint drugs reduced pancreatic cancer tumors in mice, demonstrating a possible pathway for treatment of people with pancreatic cancers whose response to standard immunotherapy is poor. Results of the experiments combining an immune system booster vaccine called PancVAX with two checkpoint drugs derived from anti-PD-1 and agonist OX40 antibodies were published in the
cancer Cancer Discovery

Loss of Tight Junction Protein Promotes Development of Precancerous Cells

Tight junctions are multi-protein complexes that serve as barriers in epithelial tissues such as the skin or lining of the gut. Loss of a specific tight junction barrier protein, claudin 18, occurs in the majority of gastric cancer patients and is correlated with poor prognosis in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Understanding how claudin 18 loss occurs and what pathways it regulates may provide new strategies to inhibit neoplastic progression
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Early Clinical Trial Data Show Gene Therapy Reversing Sickle Cell Anemia

After over a decade of preclinical research and development, a new gene therapy treatment for Sickle Cell Anemia (SCA) is reversing disease symptoms in two adults and showing early potential for transportability to resource-challenged parts of the world where SCA is most common.  Preliminary data from a pilot Phase 1-2 clinical trial testing the gene-addition therapy were presented Dec. 3 at the American Society of Hematology’s (ASH) annual meeting in San
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Johns Hopkins Researchers Advance Role of Circulating Tumor DNA to Detect Early Melanoma Growth, Uncover Treatment Options

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have added to evidence that measuring and monitoring tumor DNA that naturally circulates in the blood of melanoma patients can not only reliably help reveal the early stages of cancer growth and spread but also uncover new treatment options that tumor genetic analysis alone may not. “For some patients in our study, ctDNA (circulating tumor DNA) levels measured in a relatively simple
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Enzyme Discovery Points Researchers Toward Starving Lung Cancer as a Potential Treatment

 UT Southwestern researchers have found that an enzyme on the surface of some lung cancer cells helps feed the cancer, making it a tempting treatment target. The enzyme, transmembrane serine protease 11B (TMPRSS11B) is described in a report published today in the journal Cell Reports. In addition to being found in squamous cell lung cancer and prostate cancer, the enzyme also has been identified in squamous cell head, neck, and cervical cancers,
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A study suggests that epigenetic treatments could trigger the development of aggressive tumours

Cancer develops as a result of the accumulation of mutations in our cells. These mutations are not distributed evenly in our chromosomes, so some regions hold more than others. A study headed by the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and published in the journal Nature Cell Biologyexamined whether the opening of chromatin (a complex formed by DNA bound to proteins) is the factor that determines the accumulation of more
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Researchers stop ‘sneaky’ cancer cells in their tracks

A new study by University of Minnesota biomedical engineers shows how they stopped cancer cells from moving and spreading, even when the cells changed their movements. The discovery could have a major impact on millions of people undergoing therapies to prevent the spread of cancer within the body. The research is published today in Nature Communications, a leading research journal. Researchers have known for years that tumors have patterns that are like
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Anti-Malaria Drugs Have Shown Promise in Treating Cancer, and Now Researchers Know Why

Anti-malaria drugs known as chloroquines have been repurposed to treat cancer for decades, but until now no one knew exactly what the chloroquines were targeting when they attack a tumor. Now, researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania say they have identified that target – an enzyme called PPT1 – opening up a new pathway for potential cancer treatments. The team also used CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing
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Investigational Drug Shows Promising Results in Phase II Study of Aggressive, Often Fatal Blood Disorder with No Approved Therapies

A Phase I/II study, led by investigators at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, reports an investigational drug called tagraxofusp has demonstrated high response rates in patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN), a rare but highly aggressive – and often fatal bone marrow and blood disorder – for which there are no existing approved therapies. Findings from the study are being presented Dec. 3 at the 60th American Society of
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Immunotherapy combination and chemotherapy show encouraging results in Phase II acute myeloid leukemia study

 A triple therapy combining two immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICPIs) with the standard-of-care chemotherapy, a hypomethylating agent called azacitidine, has shown promising results for treatment of relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to findings from a Phase II study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Findings from the study, led by Naval Daver, M.D., associate professor of Leukemia, are being presented at the 60th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting & Exposition in San Diego. The
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Spread of Deadly Eye Cancer Halted in Cells and Animals

 By comparing genetic sequences in the eye tumors of children whose cancers spread with tumors that didn’t spread, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that a domino effect in cells is responsible for the cancer spreading. Their experiments suggest that blocking part of the chain of events — which they successfully accomplished in zebra fish and human cells — stops the growth and spread of the eye tumor cells.
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Combination chemotherapy and immunotherapy effective in Phase II leukemia study

A combination of the standard-of-care chemotherapy drug known as azacitidine, with nivolumab, an immune checkpoint inhibitor, demonstrated an encouraging response rate and overall survival in patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) according to findings from a Phase II study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Results from the trial, led by Naval Daver, M.D., associate professor of Leukemia, were published in the Nov. 8 online issue of Cancer Discovery. The study followed 70 patients
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Dana-Farber Scientists Find New Drug Targets in Aggressive Cancers

 Scientists have discovered a previously unknown molecular vulnerability in two rare, aggressive, and hard-to-treat types of cancer, and say it may be possible to attack this weakness with targeted drugs. Reporting in Nature Cell Biology, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute show that these two cancers – synovial sarcoma and malignant rhabdoid tumors – are dependent on a newly characterized “molecular machine” called ncBAF, which plays unique roles in regulating gene activity. The
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Low-Fat Diet Increases Cancer Survival Rate in Mice, Study Finds

Something as simple as a change in diet can potentially help to increase the cancer survival rate of obese children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common childhood cancer, according to a new study by UCLA scientists. The research team, led by Dr. Steven Mittelman, chief of pediatric endocrinology at UCLA Mattel Children’s Hospital and member of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, administered the chemotherapy drug vincristine to obese and non-obese mice
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Study Uncovers Key Parts of Mechanism for Activating T Cells to Fight Cancer and Other Diseases

In just a few years, CAR T-cell and other adoptive T-cell therapies have emerged as among the most promising forms of cancer immunotherapy. But even as these agents prove themselves against several forms of leukemia and lymphoma – and, potentially, certain solid tumors – basic questions remain about how they work. In a study published online today by the journal Immunity, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Vanderbilt
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A New Tool to Help Fight an Old Enemy – Lung Cancer

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month and in the United States, lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women. The primary reason for high death rates for lung cancer is the fact that this disease is typically detected in very late stages, when treatment is often of little use. In 2011, the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial demonstrated that high-risk smokers who received a