Biotechnology Cell Therapy Clinical Trials Immunotherapies stem cells

Dana-Farber researchers report clinical trial results in treatment of leukemia and lymphoma

New results from clinical trials of immunotherapy and experimental targeted agents for patients with leukemia and lymphoma are being presented by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting Dec. 1-4.  Here are summaries of three presentations, including one that compared outcomes of CAR T-cell therapy in patients in clinical trials with outcomes in the “real world” of clinical practice: CAR T-cell treatment provides durable
Biotechnology

Next step towards replacement therapy in type 1 diabetes

Scientists have discovered the signals that determine the fate of immature cells in the pancreas. The research shows that they are very mobile and that their destiny is strongly influenced by their immediate environment. This breakthrough published in the journal Nature will facilitate the manufacturing of pancreatic islet cells from stem cells and might help combating type 1 diabetes. Prof. Dr. Henrik Semb who led the study recently joined Helmholtz
Biotechnology Clinical Trials Research & Discovery

WVU first site to launch clinical trial utilizing non-opioid micropellet implant for chronic pain

As part of an ongoing commitment to battle opioid addiction, the Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute at West Virginia University today marked a major milestone, enrolling the first patient in a randomized clinical trial that will test the effectiveness of an injectable non-opioid, non-steroid micropellet to treat sciatica. The phase III clinical trial utilizes a clonidine micropellet, which is half the size of a grain of rice and is placed in a
Biotechnology cancer Cancer Discovery Cell Therapy drug development

Anti-Malaria Drugs Have Shown Promise in Treating Cancer, and Now Researchers Know Why

Anti-malaria drugs known as chloroquines have been repurposed to treat cancer for decades, but until now no one knew exactly what the chloroquines were targeting when they attack a tumor. Now, researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania say they have identified that target – an enzyme called PPT1 – opening up a new pathway for potential cancer treatments. The team also used CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing
Biotechnology

Project on improving lifesaving care for emergency trauma patients leads to pioneering clinical trial

Using an innovative quality improvement project to determine how to design an effective emergency trauma clinical trial, a team of surgeons at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) was able to launch the first-ever study on a high-risk damage control surgery for critical abdominal injuries. The two-year quality improvement (QI) project was aimed at decreasing the rate of damage control laparotomies (DCL), which are staged procedures commonly used
Biotechnology

Promising New Targeted Therapy for Acceleration of Bone Fracture Repair

 There are over six million fractures per year in the U.S. with direct costs in the billions, not to mention lost productivity.  The only drug currently available to accelerate the healing process must be applied directly onto the fracture surface during surgery, but not all breaks require such intervention. New research, Bone Fracture-Targeted Dasatinib Conjugate Potently Enhances Fracture Repair In Vivo, presented today at the 2018 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) PharmSci 360 Meeting highlights a novel
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UCI researchers uncover evidence of restored vision in rats following cell transplant

Researchers from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, have discovered that neurons located in the vision centers of the brains of blind rats functioned normally following fetal retina cell transplants, indicating the successful restoration of vision.  The research was published today in JNeurosci, the Journal of Neuroscience. Led by David Lyon, PhD, associate professor of Anatomy & Neurobiology and director of graduate studies at the UCI School of
Biotechnology

New Blood Test Identifies Metabolic Subtypes Linked to Autism Spectrum Disorder

NeuroPointDX announced the availability of the NPDX AA test, the first objective blood test that identifies metabolic subtypes associated with autism spectrum disorder in children as young as 18 months old. The NPDX AA test works by detecting amine imbalances in a child's fasting blood sample with very precise thresholds that were identified and validated based on samples from the Children's Autism Metabolome Project (CAMP) study (N=1100) in patients aged 18 to
Biotechnology cancer Cell Therapy Immunotherapies rare diseases

Study Uncovers Key Parts of Mechanism for Activating T Cells to Fight Cancer and Other Diseases

In just a few years, CAR T-cell and other adoptive T-cell therapies have emerged as among the most promising forms of cancer immunotherapy. But even as these agents prove themselves against several forms of leukemia and lymphoma – and, potentially, certain solid tumors – basic questions remain about how they work. In a study published online today by the journal Immunity, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Vanderbilt
Biotechnology cancer Cancer screening

A New Tool to Help Fight an Old Enemy – Lung Cancer

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month and in the United States, lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women. The primary reason for high death rates for lung cancer is the fact that this disease is typically detected in very late stages, when treatment is often of little use. In 2011, the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial demonstrated that high-risk smokers who received a
Biotechnology

New Penn Medicine Center Brings Immunotherapy Research to Brain Tumor Treatment

Today, Penn Medicine is announcing the newest Translational Center of Excellence (TCE) in the Abramson Cancer Center, focused on Glioblastoma Multiforme, the most common and lethal form of brain cancer. The team will investigate new immune therapies for glioblastoma and, in particular, design and test new CAR T cell therapies. This involves engineering patients’ T cells (the cells that act on behalf of the immune system) to attack tumor cells.
Biotechnology

Researchers Ground-Breaking Discovery Finds New Link Between Autoimmune Diseases and a Gut Bacterium

Queen’s University researchers have, for the first time, found a specific microbe in the gut that pumps out protein molecules that mimic a human protein, causing the human defence system to turn on its own cells by mistake. The culprit in this case is called Bacteroides fragilis, a bacterium that normally lives in the human gut. The Queen’s team has shown that this bacterium produces a human-like protein that could
Biotechnology cancer Clinical Trials

Researchers Use New AI Techniques in Clinical Trials for Personalized Cancer Treatment

Researchers are finding new ways to use artificial intelligence and nanotechnology to enhance treatments, from routine dental techniques to attacking cancerous tissue. At the AVS 65th International Symposium and Exhibition, being held Oct. 21-26, 2018, in Long Beach, California, Dean Ho will present the results of two clinical trials that show how AI-enabled personalized medical treatment for a prostate cancer patient and nanotechnology improved recovery for patients after a root
Biotechnology

New Breakthroughs Offer Hope for Patients with Cystic Fibrosis to Breathe Easier

Two preliminary trials have found that either of two triple-drug regimens could potentially benefit 90 percent of people with cystic fibrosis. The short-term trials found that the drug combinations improved adult patients' lung function over four weeks. But experts said they were optimistic the results will hold up in the larger, longer-term trials already underway. Researchers point to a  triple-drug approach could open up new options to nearly all cystic
Biotechnology

New approach could jumpstart breathing after spinal cord injury

 A research team at the Krembil Research Institute in Toronto has developed an innovative strategy that could help to restore breathing following traumatic spinal cord injury. The team, led by principal investigator Dr. Michael Fehlings – a neurosurgeon/neuroscientist, specialist in spinal cord injury and senior scientist at UHN – published its findings today in the journal Nature in a paper titled “Cervical excitatory neurons sustain breathing after spinal cord injury.” Using pre-clinical
Biotechnology

Johns Hopkins Grant Project Looks at Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Resistances

 Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center received a $3.1 million grant to study the resistance of limited stage small cell lung cancer to a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy (chemoradiation). The National Institutes of Health awarded the grant to researchers from The Johns Hopkins University, co-led by Luigi Marchionni, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of oncology, Christine Hann, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of oncology, and Phuoc Tran, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of
Biotechnology Regenerative Medice stem cells

New Technique Uses Umbilical Cord Stem Cells for Early Repair of Cleft Palate

A technique using umbilical cord blood stem cells could be a promising new approach for repair of cleft palate in infants, reports a paper in The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.  Performed as part of reconstructive surgery when the infant is a few months old, the stem cell procedure provides good results in growing new bone to close the upper jaw cleft – and may avoid the need for later bone graft surgery, according to the case report by Alejandro Garcia Botero, MD, of Hospital
Biotechnology

How the Brain Bounces Back: Mouse Study Reveals that Activity, not Rest, Speeds Recovery After Brain Injury

When recovering from a brain injury, getting back in the swing of things may be more effective than a prolonged period of rest, according to a new Columbia study in mice. These findings offer a compelling example of the brain’s remarkable capacity to adapt in response to trauma. They also point to new, activity-centered treatment strategies that could one day result in faster and more complete recovery times for patients
Biotechnology

Hopkins Researchers Use Endoscope to Deliver Gene Therapy in Animal Study

Fixing or replacing faulty genes has emerged as a key to unlocking cures for numerous devastating diseases. But if the new, engineered genes can’t find their way into the patient’s genomic sequence, they won’t help. Johns Hopkins gastroenterologists Florin Selaru and Vivek Kumbhari believe they’ve taken a major step in the direction of helping patients with certain liver disorders by using an increasingly common endoscopic procedure to deliver therapeutic genes to the liver via
Biotechnology Breast Cancer cancer Cancer Discovery Cancer screening Clinical Trials genes

New Study Finds Nanoparticles Show Promise in Therapy for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Approximately 10-20 percent of diagnosed breast cancers are found to be triple-negative, meaning the breast cancer cells test negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors as well as HER2 receptors, genes that can play a role in the development of breast cancer. Triple-negative breast cancer can be more aggressive and difficult to treat as the cancer cells do not respond to hormonal therapies or therapies that target HER2 receptors. A new