Arthritis Cell Therapy Clinical Trials

Small molecule could make a big difference for arthritis patients

Will there come a time when a patient with arthritis can forgo joint replacement surgery in favor of a shot? Keck School of Medicine of USC scientist Denis Evseenko, MD, PhD, has reason to be optimistic. In a new publication in the Annals of Rheumatic Diseases, Evseenko's team describes the promise of a new molecule aptly named "Regulator of Cartilage Growth and Differentiation," or RCGD 423 for short. As its
Arthritis Vaccines

$1.5 Million NIH SBIR Grant to Support Development of Rheumatoid Arthritis Vaccine

Rheumatoid Arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that mainly targets the synovial membrane, cartilage and bone.  It affects about 1% of the global population and is associated with significant morbidity and increased mortality. Anti-TNF related therapies are the current standard treatment of patients with advanced RA, but over half of the RA patients do not respond to current anti-TNF drugs such as etanercept (Enbrel®) and infliximab (Remicade®). CEL-SCI Corporation has
Arthritis Biotechnology Cell Therapy Clinical Trials Immunotherapies

Targeting ‘broken’ metabolism in immune cells reduces inflammatory disease

The team, led by researchers at Imperial College London, Queen Mary University of London and Ergon Pharmaceuticals, believes the approach could offer new hope in the treatment of inflammatory conditions like arthritis, autoimmune diseases and sepsis. In a study published this week in the journal Nature Communications, they explain how blocking a single enzyme enabled them to reprogram macrophages - the immune cells which are activated in inflammatory conditions -
Arthritis

New Assay May Lead to a Cure for Debilitating Inflammatory Joint Disease

Current treatments for rheumatoid arthritis relieve the inflammation that leads to joint destruction, but the immunologic defect that triggers the inflammation persists to cause relapses, according to research conducted at NYU Langone Medical Center and the University of Pittsburgh. Known as autoantibodies and produced by the immune system’s B cells, these defective molecules mistakenly attack the body's own proteins in an example of autoimmune disease. Now the results of a
Arthritis Biotechnology Pharmaceuticals

Reports Preclinical Data Showing LEAPS Vaccine is Successful in Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that mainly targets the synovial membrane, cartilage and bone. It affects about 1% of the global population and is associated with significant morbidity and increased mortality. Non-steroidal, as well as steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines and now more commonly the use of anti-TNFα related therapies are the current standard treatment of patients with advanced RA, but information suggests that over half of the RA patients
Arthritis Cell Therapy

Stem Cells From Jaw Bone Help Repair Damaged Cartilage

Columbia College of Dental Medicine researchers have identified stem cells that can make new cartilage and repair damaged joints. The cells reside within the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), which articulates the jaw bone to the skull. When the stem cells were manipulated in animals with TMJ degeneration, the cells repaired cartilage in the joint. A single cell transplanted in a mouse spontaneously generated cartilage and bone and even began to form
Arthritis Biotechnology

Promising Biomaterial To Build Better Bones With 3-D Printing

A Northwestern University research team has developed a 3-D printable ink that produces a synthetic bone implant that rapidly induces bone regeneration and growth. This hyperelastic “bone” material, whose shape can be easily customized, one day could be especially useful for the treatment of bone defects in children. Bone implantation surgery is never an easy process, but it is particularly painful and complicated for children. With both adults and children,
Arthritis Uncategorized

New Evidence That Testosterone May Explain Sex Difference In Knee Injury Rates

In studies on rats, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists report new evidence that the predominance of the hormone testosterone in males may explain why women are up to 10 times more likely than men to injure the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knees. Specifically, they found that normal male rats with natural supplies of testosterone had stronger ACLs than those that had been castrated and no longer produced the hormone.
Arthritis

The Search for Better Bone Replacement: 3-D Printed Bone with Just the Right Mix of Ingredients

To make a good framework for filling in missing bone, mix at least 30 percent pulverized natural bone with some special man-made plastic and create the needed shape with a 3-D printer. That’s the recipe for success reported by researchers at The Johns Hopkins University in a paper published April 18 online in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering. Each year, the Johns Hopkins scientists say, birth defects, trauma or surgery
Arthritis Biotechnology Clinical Trials Pharmaceuticals Prescriptions

New Study Shows Common NSAIDs can cause more Harm than Good

Many patients around the world, are prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (called NSAIDs) for the treatment of painful conditions, fever and inflammation. But the treatment also comes with side effects, including the risk of ulcers and increased blood pressure. A major new study from Denmark complied new research that demonstrated that a common arthritis medicine is particularly dangerous for heart patients. The study also uncovered that older types of arthritis medicine,