cancer Cancer Discovery

Stopping Cancer in Its Tracks

Researchers from the University of Chicago have shown that inhibiting autophagy, a self-devouring process used by cells to degrade large intra-cellular cargo, effectively blocks tumor cell migration and breast cancer metastasis in tumor models. In a study, published May 12, 2016, in the journal Cell Reports, they demonstrate that the process is essential for tumor metastasis and describe the mechanisms that connect autophagy to cell migration. “Using genetic and chemical
Uncategorized

Brain Cells That Aid Appetite Control Identified

It’s rare for scientists to get what they describe as “clean” results without spending a lot of time repeating the same experiment over and over again. But when researchers saw the mice they were working with doubling their weight within a month or two, they knew they were on to something. “About twenty years ago there was a big step forward in our understanding of obesity when researchers discovered that
Vaccines

Temple Scientists Eliminate HIV-1 From Genome of Human T-Cells

a team of researchers in the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University became the first to successfully eliminate the HIV-1 virus from cultured human cells. Fewer than two years later, the team has made further strides in its research by eliminating the virus from the genome of human T-cells using the specialized gene editing system they designed. In a new study published in Scientific Reports, the researchers show
Biotechnology Pharmaceutical Business News

Pfizer to Acquire Anacor Citing Strong fit with Pfizer’s Inflammation and Immunology portfolio

Pfizer Inc. and Anacor Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that they have entered into a definitive merger agreement under which Pfizer will acquire Anacor for $99.25 per Anacor share, in cash, for a total transaction value, net of cash, of approximately $5.2 billion, which assumes the conversion of Anacor’s outstanding convertible notes. The Boards of Directors of both companies have unanimously approved the transaction. Anacor’s flagship asset, crisaborole, a differentiated non-steroidal
Cardiology

A Personalized Virtual Heart Predicts the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

When electrical waves in the heart run amok in a condition called arrhythmia, sudden death can occur. To save the life of a patient at risk, doctors currently implant a small defibrillator to sense the onset of arrhythmia and jolt the heart back to a normal rhythm. But a thorny question remains: How should doctors decide which patients truly need an invasive, costly electrical implant that is not without health
Diagnostic Testing

New Technology Is Life-Saving Voice for Premature or Critically Ill Infants

A new technology in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at UC San Diego Health is able to predict the risk of life-threatening infections up to 24 hours before they appear in severely premature or critically ill infants. Infection is the leading cause of death in this fragile patient population. The Heart Rate Observation system, or HeRO, is an innovative monitoring technology that uses an algorithm to detect slight changes
Cell Therapy

Stem Cells From Diabetic Patients Coaxed to Become Insulin-Secreting Cells

Signaling a potential new approach to treating diabetes, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Harvard University have produced insulin-secreting cells from stem cells derived from patients with type 1 diabetes. People with this form of diabetes can’t make their own insulin and require regular insulin injections to control their blood sugar. The new discovery suggests a personalized treatment approach to diabetes may be on the
Gene Therapy Genomes

TSRI Team Streamlines Biomedical Research by Making Genetic Data Easier to Search

Call them professional “data wranglers.” A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) is expanding web services to make biomedical research more efficient. With their free, public projects, MyGene.info and MyVariant.info, researchers around the world have a faster way to spot new connections between genes and disease. “This is about how to deliver information quickly to biologists,” said Chunlei Wu, associate professor of molecular medicine at TSRI. Wu
Gene Therapy Genomes

Genetic Variations that Boost PKC Enzyme Contribute to Alzheimer’s Disease

In Alzheimer’s disease, plaques of amyloid beta protein accumulate in the brain, damaging connections between neurons. Now, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School have found that the enzyme Protein Kinase C (PKC) alpha is necessary for amyloid beta to damage neuronal connections. They also identified genetic variations that enhance PKC alpha activity in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. The study, published May 10
Gene Therapy Genomes

Experimental Drug Cancels Effect From Key Intellectual Disability Gene in Mice

A University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher who studies the most common genetic intellectual disability has used an experimental drug to reverse — in mice — damage from the mutation that causes the syndrome. The condition, called fragile X, has devastating effects on intellectual abilities. Fragile X affects one boy in 4,000 and one girl in 7,000. It is caused by a mutation in a gene that fails to make the protein
Arthritis

The Search for Better Bone Replacement: 3-D Printed Bone with Just the Right Mix of Ingredients

To make a good framework for filling in missing bone, mix at least 30 percent pulverized natural bone with some special man-made plastic and create the needed shape with a 3-D printer. That’s the recipe for success reported by researchers at The Johns Hopkins University in a paper published April 18 online in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering. Each year, the Johns Hopkins scientists say, birth defects, trauma or surgery
Clinical Trials

Yeast Infection Linked to Mental Illness

In a study prompted in part by suggestions from people with mental illness, Johns Hopkins researchers found that a history of Candida yeast infections was more common in a group of men with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder than in those without these disorders, and that women with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder who tested positive for Candida performed worse on a standard memory test than women with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder
cancer Gene Therapy Genomes

Discovery of Cancer Gene May Predict Survival and Guide Treatment in Patients with Mouth Cancers

Loyola researchers have identified a tumor gene that may help to predict survival outcomes in patients with cancer of the mouth and tongue. If the gene is expressed (turned on), patients are 4.6 times more likely to die at any given time, according to a study by researchers at Loyola Medicine and Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. The finding, published in the journal Otolaryngology – Head and Neck
Uncategorized

Study Suggests Medical Errors Now Third Leading Cause of Death in the U.S.

Analyzing medical death rate data over an eight-year period, Johns Hopkins patient safety experts have calculated that more than 250,000 deaths per year are due to medical error in the U.S. Their figure, published May 3 in The BMJ, surpasses the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) third leading cause of death — respiratory disease, which kills close to 150,000 people per year. The Johns Hopkins team says
Biotechnology Cell Therapy

First Skin-to-Eye Stem Cell Transplant in Humans Successful

Researchers have safely transplanted stem cells derived from a patient’s skin to the back of the eye in an effort to restore vision. The research is being presented at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) this week in Seattle, Wash. A small piece of skin from the patient’s arm was collected and modified into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). The iPSCs were
Cardiology

Study Shows How Different People Respond to Aspirin — an Important Cardioprotective Drug

Researchers have learned new information about how different people respond to aspirin, a globally prescribed drug in cardioprotection. The research team, led by scientists at Cardiff University in the United Kingdom and including representatives from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of Colorado, identified more than 5,600 lipids — or fats — in blood platelets and gained new insights into how these cells respond to aspirin. “Aspirin
cancer

Targeted Missiles Against Aggressive Cancer Cells

Targeted missiles that can enter cancer cells and deliver lethal cell toxins without harming surrounding healthy tissue. This has been a long-standing vision in cancer research, but it has proved difficult to accomplish. A research group at Lund University in Sweden has now taken some crucial steps in this direction. “For several years, we tried to elucidate which target proteins on the cancer cells’ surface can be used to help
Pharmaceutical Business News

Pharma News: Pfizer approaches Medivation about potential takeover

Reuters - Pfizer Inc has approached U.S. cancer drug maker Medivation Inc to express interest in an acquisition, raising the possibility of a bid rivaling a $9.3 billion offer by Sanofi SA, people familiar with the matter said on Tuesday. Pfizer's approach comes less than a week after Sanofi went public with its $52.50 per share cash offer, complaining that Medivation refused to engage. Medivation subsequently rejected the offer as
Antibiotics Pharmaceuticals Vaccines

Researchers Discover Potential Treatment for Sepsis and Other Uncontrollable Responses to Infection

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai say that tiny doses of a cancer drug may stop the raging, uncontrollable immune response to infection that leads to sepsis and kills up to 500,000 people a year in the U.S. The new drug treatment may also benefit millions of people worldwide who are affected by infections and pandemics. Their study reported in Science, demonstrates in both cells and
cancer

Costs for Orally-Administered Cancer Drugs Skyrocket

New cancer drugs taken in pill form have become dramatically more expensive in their first year on the market compared with drugs launched 15 years ago, a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study has found. The findings call into question the sustainability of a system that sets high prices at market entry in addition to rapidly increasing those prices over time. The researchers report April 28 in JAMA