Biotechnology

Nearly a quarter of antibiotic prescriptions for children and adults may be unnecessary

One in 10 children and about one in six adults with private insurance received antibiotics they didn’t need at least once in 2016, a new Michigan Medicine study suggests. Overall, 1 in 7 patients received unnecessary antibiotics, researchers found. Among outpatient antibiotic prescription fills by 19.2 million privately insured U.S. children and adults ages 18-64 in 2016, 23 percent were not medically justified, 36 percent were potentially appropriate, and 28
Biotechnology

Wearable sensor can detect hidden anxiety, depression in young children

Anxiety and depression are surprisingly common among young children – as many as one in five kids suffer from one of them, starting as early as the preschool years. But it can be hard to detect these conditions, known as “internalizing disorders,” because the symptoms are so inward-facing that parents, teachers and doctors often fail to notice them. The issue isn’t insignificant. If left untreated, children with internalizing disorders are
Nutrition Personal Health & Wellness

Given Up on the Salad Line? Maintaining New Year’s Resolutions is Attainable Goal says Nutritionist, Dina Khader

The beginning of the new year bought massive lines at salad chains in New York City, Boston and Washington DC. Fueled by those making New Year’s resolutions to eat healthier, salad chains like Chopt and Sweetgreen are being plagued by lines of as many as 100-plus people. According to news reports, fast food joints such as McDonald’s and Chick-fil-A were seeing a major slowdown — though that trend will surely
Biotechnology

Protecting Oligodendrocytes may reduce the impact of Multiple Sclerosis

A small molecule, Sephin1, may be able to significantly delay harm to nerve cells caused by multiple sclerosis, a disabling immune-mediated disease that damages nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord. These nerve fibers are wrapped in a sheath of fatty tissue called myelin, which acts as a protective blanket, like insulation around an electrical wire. The myelin sheath enables electrical impulses to flow along a nerve with speed
Antibiotics Biotechnology

Fever Alters Immune Cells so They can Better Reach Infections

Newswise — Fever is known to help power up our immune cells, and scientists in Shanghai have new evidence explaining how. They found in mice that fever alters surface proteins on immune cells like lymphocytes to make them better able to travel via blood vessels to reach the site of infection. Their work appears on January 15 in the journal Immunity. "One good thing about fever is that it can promote
Alzheimers and Dementia Biotechnology

Stroke drug may also prevent Alzheimer’s disease, say USC researchers

 Researchers from the University of Southern California have discovered that a drug currently being developed to treat stroke patients could also prevent Alzheimer’s disease. The study, which will be published January 15 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that the genetically engineered protein 3K3A-APC protects the brains of mice with Alzheimer’s-like symptoms, reducing the buildup of toxic peptides and preventing memory loss. 3K3A-APC is a genetically modified version of a
Biotechnology

3D Printed Implant Promotes Nerve Cell Growth to Treat Spinal Cord Injury

For the first time, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Institute of Engineering in Medicine have used rapid 3D printing technologies to create a spinal cord, then successfully implanted that scaffolding, loaded with neural stem cells, into sites of severe spinal cord injury in rats.The implants, described in a study published in the January 14 issue of Nature Medicine, are intended to promote nerve growth
Parkinson's

Gene therapy could eliminate drug side effect in Parkinson’s patients

A Michigan State University researcher has received a $2.8 million federal grant to develop a gene therapy that could reduce and possibly eliminate a frustrating side effect of a drug commonly prescribed to Parkinson’s patients. The research could mean a significant advance for the up to 90 percent of patients who develop dyskinesia, a drug-induced side effect that results in the involuntary and uncontrolled movement of hands, head and other
Alzheimers and Dementia Neurology Neuroscience

Decreased deep sleep linked to early signs of Alzheimer’s disease

 Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may have uncovered part of the explanation. They found that older people who have less slow-wave sleep – the deep sleep you need to consolidate memories and wake up feeling refreshed – have higher levels of the brain protein tau. Elevated tau is a sign of Alzheimer’s disease and has been linked to brain damage and cognitive decline. The
Biotechnology cancer Cancer Discovery

New Approach May Curb Treatment-Related Skin Fibrosis in Cancer Patients

A clinical-scientific team specializing in head-and-neck cancer has identified a way to manipulate metabolism to potentially curb skin fibrosis -- a common side effect of radiotherapy affecting quality of life of cancer survivors. The study findings from the laboratory of principal investigator Dr. Fei-Fei Liu, Chief, Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, are published online today in Nature Metabolism (DOI:10.1038/s42255-018-0008-5). Dr. Liu is also Professor and Chair,
cancer Cancer Discovery

Liver Transplant Patients Have Higher Prevalence of Colon Cancer and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

 Liver transplant patients over time experience an increasing trend toward colon cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, according to an award-winning study led by a Loyola Medicine gastroenterologist. The study by Ayokunle Abegunde, MD, MSc, and colleagues also found that lung and heart transplant patients have a higher trend toward non-melanoma skin cancer. Dr. Abegunde was the senior author of the study, presented during the American College of Gastroenterology annual conference in Philadelphia.
Biotechnology Cell Therapy stem cells

Stem Cell Signal Drives New Bone Building

In experiments in rats and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that a cellular protein signal that drives both bone and fat formation in selected stem cells can be manipulated to favor bone building. If harnessed in humans, they say, the protein — known as WISP-1 — could help fractures heal faster, speed surgical recovery and possibly prevent bone loss due to aging, injury
Biotechnology Diabetes

Experimental Stem Cell Therapy Speeds Up Wound Healing in Diabetes

The healing of wounded skin in diabetes can be sped up by more than 50 percent using injections of stem cells taken from bone marrow, a new study in mice shows. The research, led by scientists at NYU School of Medicine, focused on a chain of events in diabetes that makes skin sores more likely to form and less likely to heal. Namely, the body's failure in diabetes to break
Biotechnology Pharmaceutical Business News

Lilly to buy Loxo Oncology in $8 billion cancer push

(Reuters) Eli Lilly and Co (LLY.N) said on Monday it would buy Loxo Oncology Inc (LOXO.O) for about $8 billion in cash, making its biggest bet on a cancer therapy market expected to be worth several billions of dollars. The deal follows Bristol-Myers Squibb Co (BMY.N) agreement last week to buy Celgene Corp (CELG.O) for $74 billion, and gives Lilly access to Loxo’s portfolio of targeted medicines that treat cancers
Biotechnology

Scientists identify new fuel-delivery route for cells

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a previously unknown route for cellular fuel delivery, a finding that could shed light on the process of aging and the chronic diseases that often accompany it. With age, cells gradually lose their ability to take in and process fuel. A cell that can't fill its fuel tank, so to speak, can't perform its proper functions. Researchers are
Biotechnology

Tiny, implantable device uses light to treat bladder problems

A team of neuroscientists and engineers has developed a tiny, implantable device that has potential to help people with bladder problems bypass the need for medication or electronic stimulators. The team — from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago — created a soft, implantable device that can detect overactivity in the
Biotechnology Diabetes

Key to Weight Loss in 2019: Don’t Diet: Lose Weight!

The South Bronx is notorious for its high obesity and diabetes rates ---the highest in New York State. But Loretta Fleming, as part of a group of community health educators, is fighting this trend with new success. Loretta, herself, was a diabetic who weighed 378 pounds when she took an intensive course in diabetes self-management offered by the South Bronx community group Health People. In three years, she lost 108
Biotech Company News

Bristol-Myers Squibb to Acquire Celgene

Bristol-Myers bulks up cancer portfolio with $74 billion Celgene deal (Reuters) - Bristol-Myers Squibb Co (BMY.N) said on Thursday it would buy Celgene Corp (CELG.O) for about $74 billion, creating a major pharma company with several blockbuster cancer drugs as competition in the immunotherapy space heats up. Bristol-Myers pioneered immunotherapy with its Yervoy and later Opdivo, but has come under pressure as Merck & Co’s (MRK.N) rival treatment Keytruda moved
Cell Therapy

Stem Cell-Derived Neurons Stop Seizures and Improve Cognitive Function

About 3.4 million Americans, or 1.2 percent of the population, have active epilepsy. Although the majority respond to medication, between 20 and 40 percent of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures even after trying multiple anti-seizure drugs. Even when the drugs do work, people may develop cognitive and memory problems and depression, likely from the combination of the underlying seizure disorder and the drugs to treat it. A team
Biotechnology cancer Cancer screening

Organ-sparing treatments effective for bladder cancer; Brachytherapy cost-effective treatment for prostate cancer

Traditionally, treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer is chemotherapy followed by the removal of the patient’s entire bladder, known as a radical cystectomy. However, Beaumont researchers have data suggesting that treatment consisting of limited surgery followed by combination chemotherapy and radiation is just as effective, while allowing patients to keep their bladder and maintain function. “This is a big deal. No one wants their bladder removed,” said Craig Stevens, M.D., Ph.D., chairman,